Sappho: Poems and Fragments

References

  1. ^ See, for example, Fairweather, J. (1974). "Fiction in the biographies of ancient writers". Ancient Society 5: 231–276. ISSN 0066-1619. ; Lefkowitz, Mary R. (1981). The Lives of the Greek Poets. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. ISBN 0-8018-2748-5. 
  2. ^ (Campbell 1982, p. x-xi)
  3. ^ Page, Sappho and Alcaeus, p. 224-5.
  4. ^ P. Oxy. 1800 fr. 1
  5. ^ (Campbell 1982)
  6. ^ See e.g. Gordon, pp. xii-xiii
  7. ^ Robinson, p. 15.
  8. ^ Herodotus and Claudius Aelianus have Scamandronymus. P. Oxy. 1800 fr. 1 has Scamander or Scamandronymus. The Suda offers a plethora of possibilities: Simon, Eumenus, Eerigyius, Ecrytus, Semus, Camon, Etarchus or Scamandronymus.
  9. ^ a b (Campbell 1982, p. 15)
  10. ^ (Campbell 1982, p. 3)
  11. ^ (Campbell 1982, p. xi & 189)
  12. ^ (Campbell 1982, p. 187)
  13. ^ (Campbell 1982, p. 63 & 65)
  14. ^ Lidov, p. 203 and throughout.
  15. ^ (Campbell 1982, p. 5)
  16. ^ Holt Parker, "Sappho Schoolmistress" (orig. pub. Transactions of the American Philological Association 123 (1993), pp. 309-51.
  17. ^ Page, Sappho and Alcaeus, p. 225-6.
  18. ^ Lidov, p. 205-6.
  19. ^ For example, in Reading Sappho: Contemporary Approaches, ed. Ellen Greene, University of California Press, 1996: Mary Lefkowitz, "Critical Stereotypes and the Poetry of Sappho," pp. 28f. (the story of Sappho's death represents her as "deprived because of her ugliness of male attention...which she craves"); Judith Hallett, "Sappho and Her Social Context: Sense and Sensuality," pp. 126f., while sounding a note of caution about careless assumptions of Sappho's homosexuality, discusses the story of Sappho's sexual conversion and death in the context of "disbelief and disapproval" regarding accounts of her homosexuality, which such legends may aim to disprove; Eva Stehle, "Sappho's Gaze: Fantasies of a Goddess and Young Man," p. 195 n. 10, considers that "The story probably developed in fourth-century comedy."
  20. ^ "''Hymn to Aphrodite'', translation, and notes". Stoa.org. Retrieved 2014-02-06. 
  21. ^ De compositione verborum 23, trans. W. Rhys Roberts, Loeb Classical Library, 1910.
  22. ^ For Fragment 1 of P.Oxy. XV 1787 see the second pair of images on this page at the Oxyrhynchus Online Image Database
  23. ^ The latest reconstruction, by M. L. West, appeared in the Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik 151 (2005), 1-9, and in The Times Literary Supplement on 21 June 2005 (English translation and discussion).
  24. ^ "AOIDOI.org: Epic, Archaic and Classical Greek Poetry". Retrieved October 30, 2005. 
  25. ^ Quinn, Annalisa (January 30, 2014). "Book News: Two Poems By Greek Poet Sappho Discovered". NPR. Retrieved February 4, 2014. 
  26. ^ a b Romm, James (January 28, 2014). "Scholars Discover New Poems from Ancient Greek Poetess Sappho". The Daily Beast. Retrieved February 4, 2014. 
  27. ^ Who was Sappho? By Daniel Mendelsohn
  28. ^ D.A. Campbell, Greek lyric poetry: a selection of early Greek lyric, elegiac and iambic poetry, 1967, p. 262.
  29. ^ Rutherford, Richard. Classical Literature: A Concise History. Wiley-Blackwell, 1991. pg. 151.
  30. ^ Reynolds, Margaret. The Sappho Companion. Palgrave:New York, 2001. pg. 16.
  31. ^ Reynolds, Margaret. The Sappho Companion. Palgrave: New York, 2001. pg. 19-20.
  32. ^ (Campbell 1982, pp. 37–51)
  33. ^ English translation of the new epigrams, with notes: "Diotima". Retrieved October 30, 2005. . Greek text: "Center for Hellenic Studies - Epigrams". Retrieved October 30, 2005. 
  34. ^ (Campbell 1982, pp. 50–51)
  35. ^ Reynolds (2002) 81
  36. ^ Quintino Cataudella, "Saffo fr. 5 (5) – 6 (5) Diehl", Atene e Roma ser. 3 vol. 8 (1940), pp. 199-201. Cf. Page, Sappho and Alcaeus, p. 37.
  37. ^ An example from book 2 of the collected edition: "Virtual Exhibition". Retrieved October 30, 2005. 
  38. ^ Reynolds 2002, p. 24.
  39. ^ Schulman, Grace (2002). "Sapphics". In Annie Finch and Kathrine Varnes. An Exaltation of Forms: Contemporary Poets Celebrate the Diversity of Their Art. p. 132. ISBN 9780472067251. 
  40. ^ Wilson, Penelope (2012). "Women Writers and the Classics". In David Hopkins and Charles Martindale. The Oxford History of Classical Reception in English Literature: Volume 3 (1660-1790). p. 501. ISBN 9780199219810. 
  41. ^ Reynolds, Margaret (2000). The Sappho Companion. p. 123. ISBN 9780312295103. 
  42. ^ McPharlin, Paul (1942). The Songs of Sappho in English Translation by Many Poets. pp. 3–4. 
  43. ^ McPharlin 1942, p. 4.
  44. ^ Charles G.D. Roberts, "The Poetry of Sappho", introduction to Bliss Carman, Sappho: One Hundred Lyrics, Canadian Poetry, UWO. Web, Mar. 24, 2011.
  45. ^ McPharlin 1942, pp. 4-5.
  46. ^ Pavlovskis-Petit 2000, pp. 1227-1228.
  47. ^ Douglas Harper (2001). "Lesbian". Online Etymology Dictionary. Retrieved 2009-02-07. 
  48. ^ Douglas Harper (2001). "Sapphic". Online Etymology Dictionary. Retrieved 2009-02-07. 
  49. ^ Denys Page, Sappho and Alcaeus, Oxford UP, 1959, pp. 142-146.
  50. ^ (Campbell 1982, p. xi-xii)
  51. ^ Judith Hallett, "Sappho and Her Social Context: Sense and Sensuality"
  52. ^ Anne Pippin Burnett, Three Archaic Poets: Archilochus, Alcaeus, Sappho, Harvard UP, 1983.
  53. ^ Campbell 1982, p. 21
  54. ^ DuBois, Trojan Horses: Saving the Classics from Conservatives
  55. ^ Burnett, Three Archaic Poets, p. 210

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