Romeo and Juliet

References

Notes

All references to Romeo and Juliet, unless otherwise specified, are taken from the Arden Shakespeare second edition (Gibbons, 1980) based on the Q2 text of 1599, with elements from Q1 of 1597.[198] Under its referencing system, which uses Roman numerals, II.ii.33 means act 2, scene 2, line 33, and a 0 in place of a scene number refers to the prologue to the act.

  1. ^ Romeo and Juliet, Act 3, Scene 1, Line 73.
  2. ^ Romeo and Juliet, Act 3, Scene 5, Line 115.
  3. ^ Romeo and Juliet, Act 4, Scene 1, Line 105.
  4. ^ Romeo and Juliet, Act 5, Scene 3, Lines 308–309.
  5. ^ Halio (1998: 93).
  6. ^ Gibbons (1980: 33).
  7. ^ Moore (1930: 264–277).
  8. ^ Higgins (1998: 223).
  9. ^ a b Higgins (1998: 585)
  10. ^ a b Hosley (1965: 168).
  11. ^ Gibbons (1980: 33–34); Levenson (2000: 4).
  12. ^ a b Moore (1937: 38–44).
  13. ^ Gibbons (1980: 34–35).
  14. ^ Gibbons (1980: 35–36).
  15. ^ a b Gibbons (1980: 37).
  16. ^ Keeble (1980: 18).
  17. ^ Roberts (1902: 41–44); Gibbons (1980: 32, 36–37); Levenson (2000: 8–14).
  18. ^ Romeo and Juliet: I.iii.23.
  19. ^ a b Gibbons (1980: 26–27).
  20. ^ Gibbons (1980: 29–31). As well as A Midsummer Night's Dream, Gibbons draws parallels with Love's Labour's Lost and Richard II.
  21. ^ Gibbons (1980: 29).
  22. ^ a b c Spencer (1967: 284).
  23. ^ a b c Halio (1998: 1–2).
  24. ^ Gibbons (1980: 21).
  25. ^ Gibbons (1980: ix).
  26. ^ Halio (1998: 8–9).
  27. ^ a b Bowling (1949: 208–220).
  28. ^ Halio (1998: 65).
  29. ^ Romeo and Juliet, I.v.92–99.
  30. ^ a b Honegger (2006: 73–88).
  31. ^ Groves (2007: 68–69).
  32. ^ Groves (2007: 61)
  33. ^ Siegel (1961: 371–392).
  34. ^ Romeo and Juliet, II.v.38–42.
  35. ^ Romeo and Juliet, V.iii.169–170.
  36. ^ MacKenzie (2007: 22–42).
  37. ^ Romeo and Juliet, III.i.138.
  38. ^ Evans (1950: 841–865).
  39. ^ a b c Draper (1939: 16–34).
  40. ^ a b c Nevo (1969: 241–258).
  41. ^ Romeo and Juliet, I.i.167–171.
  42. ^ a b Parker (1968: 663–674).
  43. ^ Romeo and Juliet, II.ii.
  44. ^ Romeo and Juliet, I.v.42.
  45. ^ Romeo and Juliet, I.v.44–45.
  46. ^ Romeo and Juliet, II.ii.26–32.
  47. ^ Romeo and Juliet, I.v.85–86.
  48. ^ Romeo and Juliet, III.ii.17–19.
  49. ^ Halio (1998: 55–56).
  50. ^ a b c Tanselle (1964: 349–361).
  51. ^ Romeo and Juliet, III.iv.8–9.
  52. ^ Romeo and Juliet, II.ii.109–111
  53. ^ Romeo and Juliet, I.0.6. Levenson (2000: 142) defines "star-cross'd" as "thwarted by a malign star".
  54. ^ Muir (2005: 34–41).
  55. ^ Lucking (2001: 115–126).
  56. ^ When performed in the central yard of an inn and in public theaters such as the Globe Theatre the only source of lighting was daylight. When performed at Court, inside the stately home of a member of the nobility and in indoor theaters such as the Blackfriars theatre candle lighting was used and plays could be performed even at night.
  57. ^ Halio (1998: 55–58); Driver (1964: 363–370).
  58. ^ a b Scott (1987: 415).
  59. ^ Scott (1987: 410).
  60. ^ Scott (1987: 411–412).
  61. ^ Shapiro (1964: 498–501).
  62. ^ Bonnard (1951: 319–327).
  63. ^ a b Halio (1998: 20–30).
  64. ^ a b Halio (1998: 51).
  65. ^ Halio (1998: 47–48).
  66. ^ Halio (1998: 48–49).
  67. ^ Romeo and Juliet, II.ii.90.
  68. ^ Halio (1998: 49–50).
  69. ^ Levin (1960: 3–11).
  70. ^ Halio (1998: 51–52).
  71. ^ Halio (1998: 52–55).
  72. ^ Bloom (1998: 92–93).
  73. ^ Wells (2004: 11–13).
  74. ^ Halio (1998: 82) quoting Karl A. Meninger's 1938 Man Against Himself.
  75. ^ Appelbaum (1997: 251–272).
  76. ^ Romeo and Juliet V.i.1–11.
  77. ^ Halio (1998: 83, 81).
  78. ^ Romeo and Juliet I.v.137.
  79. ^ Halio (1998: 84–85).
  80. ^ Halio (1998: 85).
  81. ^ Romeo and Juliet, III.i.112.
  82. ^ Kahn (1977: 5–22); Halio (1998: 87–88).
  83. ^ Halio (1998: 89–90).
  84. ^ Levenson (2000: 25–26)
  85. ^ Halio (1998: 85–86).
  86. ^ Romeo and Juliet, II.i.24–26
  87. ^ Rubinstein (1989: 54)
  88. ^ Romeo and Juliet, II.ii.43–44.
  89. ^ Goldberg (1994: 221–227).
  90. ^ a b Leveen, Lois (October 28, 2014). "Romeo and Juliet Has No Balcony". The Atlantic. Retrieved January 30, 2015. 
  91. ^ "Balcony". Merriam-Webster.com. Retrieved January 30, 2015. 
  92. ^ a b Halio (1998: 97).
  93. ^ a b Halio (1998: ix).
  94. ^ Taylor (2002: 18). The five more popular plays, in descending order, are Henry VI, Part 1, Richard III, Pericles, Hamlet and Richard II.
  95. ^ Levenson (2000: 62).
  96. ^ Dawson (2002: 176)
  97. ^ Marsden (2002: 21).
  98. ^ Van Lennep (1965).
  99. ^ a b c d Halio (1998: 100–102).
  100. ^ Levenson (2000: 71).
  101. ^ Marsden (2002: 26–27).
  102. ^ Branam (1984: 170–179); Stone (1964: 191–206).
  103. ^ Pedicord (1954: 14).
  104. ^ Morrison (2007: 231).
  105. ^ Morrison (2007: 232).
  106. ^ Gay (2002: 162).
  107. ^ Halliday (1964: 125, 365, 420).
  108. ^ The Times 30 December 1845, cited by Gay (2002: 162).
  109. ^ Potter (2001: 194–195).
  110. ^ Levenson (2000: 84)
  111. ^ Schoch (2002: 62–63).
  112. ^ Halio (1998: 104–105).
  113. ^ Winter (1893: 46–47, 57). Booth's Romeo and Juliet was rivalled in popularity only by his own "hundred night Hamlet" at The Winter Garden of four years before.
  114. ^ Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800–2014. Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Retrieved February 27, 2014.
  115. ^ First page of the program for the opening night performance of Romeo and Juliet at Booth's Theatre, 3 February 1869.
  116. ^ Holland (2002: 202–203)
  117. ^ Levenson (2000: 69–70).
  118. ^ Tad Mosel, "Leading Lady: The World and Theatre of Katharine Cornell," Little, Brown & Co., Boston (1978)
  119. ^ Smallwood (2002: 102).
  120. ^ Halio (1998: 105–107).
  121. ^ Smallwood (2002: 110).
  122. ^ Halio (1998: 107–109).
  123. ^ a b Levenson (2000: 87).
  124. ^ Holland (2001: 207).
  125. ^ The Times 19 September 1960, cited by Levenson (2000: 87).
  126. ^ Halio (1998: 110).
  127. ^ Halio (1998: 110–112).
  128. ^ Pape (1997: 69).
  129. ^ Quince (2000: 121–125).
  130. ^ Lujan (2005).
  131. ^ a b Howard (2000: 297).
  132. ^ Edgar (1982: 162).
  133. ^ Marks (1997).
  134. ^ Houlihan Mary, "Wherefore Art Thou, Romeo? To Make Us Laugh at Navy Pier", Chicago Sun-Times (16 May 2004)
  135. ^ Barranger (2004: 47).
  136. ^ New York Times (1977).
  137. ^ Hetrick, Adam and Andrew Gans (2013-11-19). "Broadway Revival of Romeo and Juliet, Starring Orlando Bloom and Condola Rashad, Will Close Dec. 8". Playbill. Retrieved 2014-05-29. 
  138. ^ Nestyev (1960: 261).
  139. ^ Sanders (2007: 66–67)
  140. ^ Winn, Steven (April 24, 2007). "Michael Smuin: 1938-2007/Prolific dance director had showy career". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved October 14, 2013. 
  141. ^ Buhler (2007: 156); Sanders (2007: 187).
  142. ^ Meyer (1962: 34–37).
  143. ^ Sadie (1996: 31); Holden (1993: 393).
  144. ^ Collins (1982: 532–538).
  145. ^ Sanders (2007: 43–45).
  146. ^ Stites (1995: 5).
  147. ^ Romeo and Juliet I.v, II.ii, III.v, V.iii.
  148. ^ Sanders (2007: 42–43).
  149. ^ Sanders (2007: 42).
  150. ^ Sanders (2007: 187).
  151. ^ Romeo and Juliet I.0.6.
  152. ^ Sanders (2007: 20).
  153. ^ Sanders (2007: 187-8)
  154. ^ "Interview with Taylor Swift". Time. Time Warner. 23 April 2009. Retrieved 21 January 2012. 
  155. ^ Buhler (2007: 157)
  156. ^ Sanders (2007: 75–76).
  157. ^ Ehren (1999).
  158. ^ Arafay (2005: 186).
  159. ^ Levenson (2000: 49–50).
  160. ^ Bloom (1998: 89).
  161. ^ Levenson (2000: 91), crediting this list of genres to Stanley Wells.
  162. ^ "Romeo", Merriam-Webster Online.
  163. ^ Bly (2001: 52)
  164. ^ Muir (2005: 352–362).
  165. ^ Fowler (1996: 111)
  166. ^ Romeo and Juliet V.iii.
  167. ^ Fowler (1996:112–113).
  168. ^ Fowler (1996: 120).
  169. ^ Fowler (1996: 126–127)
  170. ^ Orgel (2007: 91).
  171. ^ Simon & Schuster author page, retrieved 4/19/2014 http://books.simonandschuster.com/Juliets-Nurse/Lois-Leveen/9781476757445
  172. ^ a b Brode (2001: 42).
  173. ^ Rosenthal (2007: 225).
  174. ^ Brode (2001: 43).
  175. ^ Brode (2001: 48).
  176. ^ Tatspaugh (2000: 138).
  177. ^ Brode (2001: 48–9)
  178. ^ Brode (2001: 51) quoting Renato Castellani.
  179. ^ Orgel (2007: 91).
  180. ^ Brode (2001: 51–52); Rosenthal (2007: 218).
  181. ^ For example, by Anthony West of Vogue and Mollie Panter-Downes of The New Yorker, cited by Brode (2001: 51–53).
  182. ^ Brode (2001: 53).
  183. ^ Romeo and Juliet, III.v.
  184. ^ Rosenthal (2007: 218–220).
  185. ^ Tatspaugh (2000: 140).
  186. ^ Tatspaugh (2000: 142).
  187. ^ Rosenthal (2007: 215–216).
  188. ^ Daily Mail "Disney's teenage musical 'phenomenon' premieres in London". Daily Mail. 11 September 2006. Retrieved 19 August 2007. 
  189. ^ McKernan and Terris (1994: 141–156) list 39 instances of uses of Romeo and Juliet, not including films of the play itself.
  190. ^ Lanier (2007: 96); McKernan and Terris (1994: 146).
  191. ^ Howard (2000: 310); Rosenthal (2007: 228).
  192. ^ Srivastava, Priyanka (29 November 2013). "WEEKEND ENTERTAINMENT: From Ram-leela to Haider, Bollywood's attraction to Shakespeare continues". Daily Mail. Retrieved 25 January 2014. 
  193. ^ Goyal, Divya (6 December 2013). "'Ram Leela' box office collections hit massive Rs 100 crore, pulverises prediction". The Financial Express. Retrieved 25 January 2014. 
  194. ^ "‘Ram-leela’ Review Roundup: Critics Hail Film as Best Adaptation of 'Romeo and Juliet'". International Business Times. 15 November 2013. Retrieved 25 January 2014. 
  195. ^ http://bigstory.ap.org/article/romeo-and-juliet-bloom-becomes-v-day-film
  196. ^ romeoandjulietcinema.com
  197. ^ "Modern take for Shakespeare play Romeo and Juliet". BBC News. 12 April 2010. Retrieved 23 April 2010. 
  198. ^ Gibbons (1980: vii).

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