Othello

why is othello so angered by street fighting at this particular time on cyprus

why is othello so angered by street fighting at this particular time on cyprus

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When Othello breaks up the quarrel, he asks, "are we turn'd Turks" (II.iii.170). Indeed the Turks are the enemy in Cyprus, but it is interesting that Othello uses language that conveys otherness. Much like the stereotypes that are hurled his way, Othello contrasts the "barbarous" behavior with the "Christian" brotherhood of the Venetians. His language dehumanizes the Turks and makes them seem animal, echoing Brabantio's dismissal of Othello in front of the Duke. This is a common tactic in times of war, to foment national pride while denigrating the enemy. However, this isn't war that Othello is in, and things are not as clear-cut in personal battles and politics. Othello considers all of his men in Cyprus to be friends, since they are allies; this is another example of Othello's confusion between the worldly and the personal spheres. Hence, Iago is again able to successfully misrepresent himself; this time, he pretends that he is there merely to settle the quarrel, when he is the engineer of the whole affair.

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http://www.gradesaver.com/othello/study-guide/summary-act-ii