Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

From what source does Douglass learn the meaning of abolition?





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I'm sorry, you've posted a multiple choice question but neglected to post the choices. From the text, we learn that Douglass came to understand the meaning of abolition from the city paper.

The dictionary afforded me little or no help. I found it was "the act of abolishing;" but then I did not know what was to be abolished. Here I was perplexed. I did not dare to ask any one about its meaning, for I was satisfied that it was something they wanted me to know very little about. After a patient waiting, I got one of our city papers, containing an account of the number of petitions from the north, praying for the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia, and of the slave trade between the States. From this time I understood the words abolition and abolitionist, and always drew near when that word was spoken, expecting to hear something of importance to myself and fellow-slaves.


Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass