Maya Angelou: Poems

References

Explanatory notes

  1. ^ Angelou wrote about Vivian Baxter's life and their relationship in Mom & Me & Mom (2013), her final installment in her series of seven autobiographies.
  2. ^ According to Angelou, Annie Henderson built her business with food stalls catering to black workers, which eventually developed into a store.[9]
  3. ^ The correct Greek spelling of Angelou's husband name is probably "Anastasios Angelopoulos".[25]
  4. ^ Reviewer John M. Miller calls Angelou's performance of her song "All That Happens in the Marketplace" the "most genuine musical moment in the film".[31]
  5. ^ In Angelou's third book of essays, Letter to My Daughter (2009), she credits Cuban artist Celia Cruz as one of the greatest influences of her singing career, and later, credits Cruz for the effectiveness and impact of Angelou's poetry performances and readings.[33]
  6. ^ Guy Johnson, who as a result of this accident in Accra and one in the late 1960s, underwent a series of spinal surgeries. He, like his mother, became a writer and poet.[42]
  7. ^ Angelou called her friendship with Malcolm X "a brother/sister relationship".[46]
  8. ^ Angelou did not celebrate her birthday for many years, choosing instead to send flowers to King's widow Coretta Scott King.[50]
  9. ^ See Mom & Me & Mom, pp. 168—178, for a description of Angelou's experience in Stockholm.
  10. ^ Angelou described their marriage, which she called "made in heaven",[56] in her second book of essays Even the Stars Look Lonesome (1997).
  11. ^ Angelou co-wrote "And So It Goes" on Flack's 1988 album Oasis.[58]
  12. ^ Angelou dedicated her 1993 book of essays Wouldn't Take Nothing for My Journey Now to Winfrey.[63]
  13. ^ In her fifth autobiography All God's Children Need Traveling Shoes (1987), Angelou recounts being identified, on the basis of her appearance, as part of the Bambara people, a subset of the Mande.[94]
  14. ^ See Gillespie et al., pp. 153–175.
  15. ^ Angelou describes her brother's addiction to heroin in Mom & Me & Mom, pp. 189—194.
  16. ^ In Angelou's essay, "My Grandson, Home at Last", published in Woman's Day in 1986, she describes the kidnapping and her response to it.[100]
  17. ^ In Letter to My Daughter (2009), Angelou's third book of essays, she related the first time she used legal pads to write.[107]

Citations

  1. ^ "Maya Angelou". SwissEduc.com. December 17, 2013. 
  2. ^ Glover, Terry (December 2009). "Dr. Maya Angelou". Ebony 65 (2): 67. 
  3. ^ a b Stanley, Alessandra (17 May 1992). "Whose Honor Is It, Anyway". The New York Times. Retrieved 23 November 2014. 
  4. ^ Ferrer, Anne (May 29, 2014). "Angelou's optimism overcame hardships". The Star Phoenix. Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
  5. ^ a b c Lupton, p. 4.
  6. ^ Angelou (1969), p. 67.
  7. ^ Angelou (1969), p. 6.
  8. ^ Johnson, Claudia (2008). "Introduction". In Johnson, Claudia. Racism in Maya Angelou's I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. Detroit, Michigan: Gale Press. p. 11. ISBN 978-0-7377-3905-3. 
  9. ^ Angelou (1993), pp. 21–24.
  10. ^ a b Younge, Gary (November 13, 2013). "Maya Angelou: 'I'm fine as wine in the summertime". The Guardian (London). Retrieved December 20, 2013. 
  11. ^ Angelou (1969), p. 52.
  12. ^ Braxton, Joanne M. (1999). Maya Angelou's I Know why the Caged Bird Sings: A Casebook. Oxford University Press. p. 121. ISBN 9780195116076. 
  13. ^ Lupton, p. 5.
  14. ^ "Maya Angelou I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings". World Book Club. BBC World Service. October 2005. Retrieved 17 December 2013. 
  15. ^ Gillespie et al., p. 22.
  16. ^ Gillespie et al., pp. 21–22.
  17. ^ a b Angelou (1969), p. 13.
  18. ^ Gillespie et al., p. 23.
  19. ^ a b Lupton, p. 15.
  20. ^ Gillespie et al., p. 28.
  21. ^ Angelou (1969), p. 279.
  22. ^ Long, Richard (1 November 2005). "35 Who Made a Difference: Maya Angelou". Smithsonian Magazine. Retrieved 17 December 2013. 
  23. ^ Hagen, p. xvi.
  24. ^ Gillespie et al., pp. 29, 31.
  25. ^ Powell, Dannye Romine (1994). "Maya Angelou". Parting the Curtains: Interviews with Southern Writers. Winston-Salem, North Carolina: John F. Blair Publisher. p. 10. ISBN 0-89587-116-5. 
  26. ^ a b Angelou (1993), p. 95.
  27. ^ Gillespie et al., pp. 36–37.
  28. ^ Gillespie et al., p. 38.
  29. ^ Gillespie et al., p. 41.
  30. ^ Hagen, pp. 91–92.
  31. ^ a b c Miller, John M. "Calypso Heat Wave". Turner Classic Movies. Retrieved December 18, 2013. 
  32. ^ Gillespie et al., p. 48.
  33. ^ Angelou (2008), p. 80.
  34. ^ Gillespie et al., pp. 49–51.
  35. ^ a b c d e f g h Als, Hilton (5 August 2002). "Songbird: Maya Angelou takes another look at herself". The New Yorker. Retrieved 18 December 2013. 
  36. ^ Hagen, p. 103.
  37. ^ Gillespie et al., p. 57.
  38. ^ Gillespie et al., p. 64.
  39. ^ Gillespie et al., p. 59.
  40. ^ Gillespie et al., p. 65.
  41. ^ Gillespie et al., p. 71.
  42. ^ Gillespie, p. 156.
  43. ^ Gillespie et al., pp. 74, 75.
  44. ^ Braxton, p. 3.
  45. ^ Gillespie et al., pp. 79–80.
  46. ^ "Maya Angelou Interview". Academy of Achievement. p. 2. Retrieved 18 December 2013. 
  47. ^ Boyd, Herb (5 August 2010). "Maya Angelou Remembers James Baldwin". New York Amsterdam News 100 (32): 17. 
  48. ^ Gillespie et al., pp. 85–96.
  49. ^ a b Gillespie et al., p. 98.
  50. ^ a b c Minzesheimer, Bob (26 March 2008). "Maya Angelou celebrates her 80 years of pain and joy". USA Today. Retrieved 22 November 2014. 
  51. ^ All 10 episodes of Blacks, Blues, Black! can be viewed online: https://diva.sfsu.edu/collections/sfbatv/10287.
  52. ^ Angelou, Maya (February 1982). "Why I Moved Back to the South". Ebony (37). Retrieved 19 December 2013. 
  53. ^ Smith, Dinitia (23 January 2007). "A Career in Letters, 50 Years and Counting". The New York Times. Retrieved 19 December 2013. 
  54. ^ Brown, Avonie (4 January 1997). "Maya Angelou: The Phenomenal Woman Rises Again". New York Amsterdam News (88): 2. 
  55. ^ Gillespie et al., p. 105.
  56. ^ Angelou, Maya (1997). Even the Stars Look Lonesome. New York: Random House. p. 1. ISBN 978-0-553-37972-3.
  57. ^ Gillespie et al., p. 119.
  58. ^ Feeney, Nolan (28 May 2014). "Roberta Flack Remembers Maya Angelou: ‘We All Have Been Inspired’". Time Magazine. Retrieved 15 November 2014. 
  59. ^ Gillespie et al., p. 110.
  60. ^ a b Moore, Lucinda (April 2003). "Growing Up Maya Angelou". Smithsonian Magazine. Retrieved 19 December 2013. 
  61. ^ Wolf, Matt (March 20, 2012). "The National Theatre's Global Flair". The New York Times. Retrieved September 2, 2014. 
  62. ^ Winfrey, Oprah (December 2000). "Oprah Talks to Maya Angelou". O Magazine. Retrieved 19 December 2013. 
  63. ^ Angelou (1993), p. x.
  64. ^ Glover, Terry (December 2009). "Dr. Maya Angelou". Ebony (65): 67. 
  65. ^ a b c d Hewlett, Michael (28 May 2014). "Maya Angelou, famed poet, writer, activist, dead at 86". The Winston-Salem Journal. Retrieved 16 November 2014. 
  66. ^ Cohen, Patricia (host) (1 October 2008). "Book Discussion on Letter to My Daughter". CSPAN Video Library (Documentary). The New York Times. Retrieved 13 December 2013. 
  67. ^ Gillespie et al., p. 126.
  68. ^ McGrath, Kim (2 June 2014). "Remembering Dr. Maya Angelou". News Center. Wake Forest University. Retrieved 2 June 2014. 
  69. ^ a b c Manegold, Catherine S. (20 January 1993). "An Afternoon with Maya Angelou; A Wordsmith at Her Inaugural Anvil". The New York Times. Retrieved 20 December 2013. 
  70. ^ a b c d Younge, Gary (24 May 2002). "No surrender". The Guardian. Retrieved 20 December 2013. 
  71. ^ a b Gillepsie et al., p. 9.
  72. ^ Berkman, Meredith (26 February 1993). "Everybody's All American". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved 20 December 2013. 
  73. ^ Gillespie et al., p. 142.
  74. ^ Long, p. 84.
  75. ^ a b Gillespie et al., p. 144.
  76. ^ Letkemann, Jessica (28 May 2014). "Maya Angelou's Life in Music: Ashford & Simpson Collab, Calypso Album & More". Billboard Magazine. Retrieved 16 November 2014. 
  77. ^ Gillespie et al., p. 10.
  78. ^ Williams, Jeannie (10 January 2002). "Maya Angelou pens her sentiments for Hallmark". USA Today. Retrieved 20 December 2013. 
  79. ^ a b c d Alter, Alexander (28 May 2014). "Author, Poet Maya Angelou Dies". The Wall Street Journal
  80. ^ Gillespie et al., p. 175.
  81. ^ Mooney, Alexander (10 December 2008). "Clinton camp answers Oprah with Angelou". CNN Politics.com. Retrieved 4 April 2009. 
  82. ^ Williams, Krissah (18 January 2008). "Presidential candidates court S.C. black newspaper". Washington Post. Retrieved 4 April 2009. 
  83. ^ Zeleny, Jeff; Marjorie Connelly (January 27, 2008). "Obama Carries South Carolina by Wide Margin". New York Times. Retrieved April 4, 2009. 
  84. ^ Parker, Jennifer (19 January 2009). "From King's 'I Have a Dream' to Obama Inauguration". ABC News. Retrieved 20 December 2013. 
  85. ^ Waldron, Clarence (11 November 2010). "Maya Angelou Donates Private Collection to Schomburg Center in Harlem". Jet Magazine. Retrieved 20 December 2013. 
  86. ^ Lee, Felicia R (26 October 2010). "Schomburg Center in Harlem Acquires Maya Angelou Archive". The New York Times. Retrieved 20 December 2013. 
  87. ^ Weingarten, Gene; Ruane, Michael E. (30 August 2011). "Maya Angelou says King memorial inscription makes him look ‘arrogant’". The Washington Post. Retrieved 17 November 2014. 
  88. ^ Ruane, Michael E. (11 December 2011). "Controversial King memorial inscription to be removed, not replaced". The Washington Post. Retrieved 17 November 2014. 
  89. ^ Sayers, Valerie (27 March 2013). "'Mom & Me & Mom,' by Maya Angelou". The Washington Post. Retrieved 20 December 2013. 
  90. ^ Tate, p. 150.
  91. ^ Angelou, Maya (1984). "Shades and Slashes of Light". In Evans, Mari. Black Women Writers (1950–1980): A Critical Evaluation. Garden City, New York: Doubleday. p. 5. ISBN 978-0-385-17124-3. 
  92. ^ Toppman, p. 145.
  93. ^ Gates, Jr., Henry L. (host) (2008). "African American Lives 2: The Past is Another Country (Part 4)". PBS. Retrieved 20 December 2013. 
  94. ^ Angelou, Maya (1986). All God's Children Need Traveling Shoes. New York: Vintage Books. pp. 206–207. ISBN 978-0-679-73404-8.
  95. ^ Gates, Jr., Henry L. (host) (2008). "African American Lives 2: A Way out of No Way (Part 2)". PBS. Retrieved 20 December 2013. 
  96. ^ Lupton, p. 2.
  97. ^ Gillespie et al., p. 156.
  98. ^ Gillespie et al., p. 155.
  99. ^ Beyette, Beverly (12 June 1986). "Angelou's 4-Year Search for Grandson : Kidnaping Spurs Emotional Odyssey". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 19 November 2014. 
  100. ^ Lupton, p. 19.
  101. ^ a b c Younge, Gary (2009-11-13). "Maya Angelou: 'I'm fine as wine in the summertime'". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 2013-12-13. 
  102. ^ a b Yee, Vivian (29 May 2014). "Maya Angelou Often Left New York, but She Always Came Back". The New York Times. p. A23. Retrieved 18 November 2014. 
  103. ^ Gillespie et al., p. 150.
  104. ^ Pierce, Donna (5 January 2005). "Welcome to her world: Poet-author Maya Angelou blends recipes and memories in winning style". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 24 November 2013. 
  105. ^ Crea, Joe (18 January 2011). "Maya Angelou's cookbook 'Great Food, All Day Long' exudes cozy, decadence". Northeast Ohio Media Group. Retrieved 20 December 2013. 
  106. ^ Sarler, Carol (1989). "A Day in the Life of Maya Angelou". In Elliot, Jeffrey M. Conversations with Maya Angelou. Jackson, Mississippi: University Press. p. 217. ISBN 978-0-87805-362-9. 
  107. ^ Angelou (2008), pp. 63—67.
  108. ^ a b c d "Maya Angelou I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings". World Book Club (interview). BBC World Service. October 2005. Retrieved 20 December 2013. 
  109. ^ "Dr. Maya Angelou dead at 86". Winston-Salem, North Carolina: WXII12.com. Retrieved 28 May 2014. 
  110. ^ Johnson, Guy (7 June 2014). "Full Remarks: Angelou's son, Guy Johnson". WXII12.com. Retrieved 16 June 2014. 
  111. ^ "Maya Angelou 'the brightest light' says Barack Obama". BBC News. 28 May 2014. Retrieved 28 May 2014. 
  112. ^ Jenkins, Colleen; Trott, Bill (28 May 2014). "U.S. author, poet Maya Angelou dies at 86". Reuters. Retrieved May 28, 2014. 
  113. ^ WBTV Web Staff (29 May 2014). "Dr Maya Angelou remembered at public memorial service". Winston-Salem, NC, U.S.: Worldnow and WDAM TV. Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
  114. ^ "Poet Maya Angelou remembered at memorial service". News & Record. Associated Press. 7 June 2014. Retrieved 8 June 2014. 
  115. ^ Tobar, Hector (4 June 2014). "Maya Angelou's memorial service to be live-streamed". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 11 June 2014. 
  116. ^ "PROGRAM NOTE: Maya Angelou, French Open". WXII. 7 June 2014. Retrieved 11 June 2014. 
  117. ^ "Maya Angelou memorial service set for Saturday, will be shown live on FOX8 and MyFOX8.com". WGHP. 5 June 2014. Retrieved 11 June 2014. 
  118. ^ Smith, Christie; Cestone, Vince (15 June 2014). "Maya Angelou Remembered as 'Daughter of San Francisco' at Glide Memorial Church". NBC Bay Area.com. Retrieved 16 June 2014. 
  119. ^ a b O'Neal, Lonnae (April 6, 2015). "Maya Angelou’s new stamp uses a quote that may not be entirely hers". The Washington Post
  120. ^ Ian Crouch, "Maya Angelou and the Internet's stamp of approval", The New Yorker, April 10, 2015.
  121. ^ Lupton, p. 98.
  122. ^ Lupton, p. 1.
  123. ^ Gilmor, Susan (7 April 2013). "Angelou: Writing about Mom emotional process". The Winston-Salem Journal. Retrieved 14 April 2013. 
  124. ^ a b c "Maya Angelou". Poetry Foundation. Retrieved 20 December 2013. 
  125. ^ Italie, Hillel (6 May 2011). "Robert Loomis, Editor of Styron, Angelou, Retires". The Washington Times. Associated Press. Retrieved 20 December 2013. 
  126. ^ Martin, Arnold (April 12, 2001). "Making Books; Familiarity Breeds Content". The New York Times. Retrieved December 20, 2013. 
  127. ^ Tate, p. 155.
  128. ^ McPherson, Dolly A. (1990). Order Out of Chaos: The Autobiographical Works of Maya Angelou. New York: Peter Lang Publishing. pp. 10–11. ISBN 0-8204-1139-6. 
  129. ^ a b Moyer, Homer E (2003). The R.A.T. Real-World Aptitude Test: Preparing Yourself for Leaving Home. Herndon, New York: Capital Books. p. 297. ISBN 978-1-931868-42-6. 
  130. ^ a b c d McWhorter, p. 40.
  131. ^ a b c Braxton, p. 4.
  132. ^ Long, p. 85.
  133. ^ Feeney, Nolan (28 May 2014). "A Brief History of How Maya Angelou Influenced Hip Hop". Time Magazine. Retrieved 14 November 2014. 
  134. ^ a b Washington, Elsie B. (March–April 2002). "A Song Flung Up to Heaven". Black Issues Book Review 4 (2): 56. 
  135. ^ Brozan, Nadine (30 January 1993). "Chronicle". The New York Times. Retrieved 21 December 2013. 
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  141. ^ "Past Winners". Tony Awards. Retrieved 21 December 2013. 
  142. ^ "National Commission on the observance of International Women's Year, 1975 Appointment of Members and Presiding Officer of the Commission". The American Presidency Project. 28 March 1977. Retrieved 21 December 2013. 
  143. ^ "Spingarn Medal Winners". NAACP. Retrieved 7 June 2015. 
  144. ^ "Sculptor, Painter among National Medal of Arts Winners". CNN.com. 20 December 2000. Retrieved 21 December 2013. 
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  149. ^ DeGout, p. 122.
  150. ^ Bloom, Lynn Z. (1985). "Maya Angelou". Dictionary of Literary Biography African American Writers after 1955 38. Detroit, Michigan: Gale Research Company. pp. 10–11. ISBN 0-8103-1716-8. 
  151. ^ Burr, p. 181.
  152. ^ Bloom, Harold (2001). Maya Angelou. Broomall, Pennsylvania: Chelsea House Publishers. p. 9. ISBN 978-0-7910-5937-1. 
  153. ^ Burr, p. 183.
  154. ^ Lupton, p. 29–30.
  155. ^ Lauret, p. 98.
  156. ^ Lupton, p. 32.
  157. ^ a b Lupton, p. 34.
  158. ^ Sartwell, Crispin (1998). Act Like You Know: African-American Autobiography and White Identity. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. p. 26. ISBN 978-0-226-73527-6. 
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  160. ^ a b Walker, p. 92.
  161. ^ McWhorter, p. 41.
  162. ^ Bloom, Lynn Z. (2008). "The Life of Maya Angelou". In Johnson, Claudia. Racism in Maya Angelou's I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. Detroit, Michigan: Gale Press. p. 17. ISBN 978-0-7377-3905-3. 
  163. ^ O'Neale, p. 32.
  164. ^ a b O'Neale, p. 34.
  165. ^ McWhorter, p. 39.
  166. ^ McWhorter, p. 38.
  167. ^ McWhorter, pp. 40–41.
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Works cited

  • Angelou, Maya (1969). I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. New York: Random House. ISBN 978-0-375-50789-2
  • Angelou, Maya (1993). Wouldn't Take Nothing for My Journey Now. New York: Random House. ISBN 978-0-394-22363-6
  • Angelou, Maya (2008). Letter to My Daughter. New York: Random House. ISBN 978-0-8129-8003-5
  • Braxton, Joanne M., ed. (1999). Maya Angelou's I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings: A Casebook. New York: Oxford Press. ISBN 978-0-19-511606-9
    • Braxton, Joanne M. "Symbolic Geography and Psychic Landscapes: A Conversation with Maya Angelou", pp. 3–20
    • Tate, Claudia. "Maya Angelou: An Interview", pp. 149–158
  • Burr, Zofia (2002). Of Women, Poetry, and Power: Strategies of Address in Dickinson, Miles, Brooks, Lorde, and Angelou. Urbana, Illinois: University of Illinois Press. ISBN 978-0-252-02769-7
  • DeGout, Yasmin Y. (2009). "The Poetry of Maya Angelou: Liberation Ideology and Technique". In Bloom's Modern Critical Views—Maya Angelou, Harold Bloom, ed. New York: Infobase Publishing, pp. 121–132. ISBN 978-1-60413-177-2
  • Gillespie, Marcia Ann, Rosa Johnson Butler, and Richard A. Long. (2008). Maya Angelou: A Glorious Celebration. New York: Random House. ISBN 978-0-385-51108-7
  • Hagen, Lyman B. (1997). Heart of a Woman, Mind of a Writer, and Soul of a Poet: A Critical Analysis of the Writings of Maya Angelou. Lanham, Maryland: University Press. ISBN 978-0-7618-0621-9
  • Lauret, Maria (1994). Liberating Literature: Feminist Fiction in America. New York: Routledge Press. ISBN 978-0-415-06515-3
  • Long, Richard (2005). "Maya Angelou". Smithsonian 36, (8): pp. 84–85
  • Lupton, Mary Jane (1998). Maya Angelou: A Critical Companion. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press. ISBN 978-0-313-30325-8
  • McWhorter, John (2002). "Saint Maya." The New Republic 226, (19): pp. 35–41.
  • O'Neale, Sondra (1984). "Reconstruction of the Composite Self: New Images of Black Women in Maya Angelou's Continuing Autobiography", in Black Women Writers (1950–1980): A Critical Evaluation, Mari Evans, ed. Garden City, N.Y: Doubleday. ISBN 978-0-385-17124-3
  • Toppman, Lawrence (1989). "Maya Angelou: The Serene Spirit of a Survivor", in Conversations with Maya Angelou, Jeffrey M. Elliot, ed. Jackson, Mississippi: University Press. ISBN 978-0-87805-362-9
  • Walker, Pierre A. (October 1995). "Racial Protest, Identity, Words, and Form in Maya Angelou's I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings". College Literature 22, (3): pp. 91–108.

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