Macbeth (Shakespeare)

Describe the relationship between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth? (act 1, sc V)

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At Inverness, Lady Macbeth reads a letter from Macbeth that describes his meeting with the witches. She fears that his nature is not ruthless enough-- he's "too full o' th' milk of human kindness” (15)—to murder Duncan and assure the completion of the witches' prophesy. He has ambition enough, she claims, but lacks the gumption to act on it. She then implores him to hurry home so that she can "pour [her] spirits in [his] ear" (24)—in other words, goad him on to the murder he must commit. When a messenger arrives with the news that Duncan is coming, Lady Macbeth calls on the heavenly powers to "unsex me here" and fill her with cruelty, taking from her all natural womanly compassion (39). When Macbeth arrives, she greets him as Glamis and Cawdor and urges him to "look like the innocent flower, / but be the serpent under’t" (63-64). She then says that she will make all the preparations for the king's visit and subsequent murder.

In this analysis, we see a strong marital relationship that seems to be strengthened by mutual ambition and desire rather than love. Macbeth immediately informs his wife of the witches' prophecy..... she, in turn, immediately offers her help. In this Act, the audience sees their marriage as a partnership...... what needs to be accomplished will require them to work together.