Lord of the Flies

its a lot but really need help!

1. How does Jack use rhetorical structures in his attempt to wrestle power from Ralph (p. 126)?

2. Explain the irony in Jack’s saying, “I’m not going to play any longer. Not with you” (p. 127).

3. Simon climbs the mountain to face the beast alone, asking “What else is there to do?” (p. 128). Why does Simon stand and act apart from the other boys? Why does he not take sides? How are Simon’s perceptions different from Ralph’s and Jack’s?

4. Analyze the contrasting imagery of butterflies and blood in the death scene of the mother pig (p. 135). What emotions might this imagery evoke in the reader?

5. What is Simon’s “ancient, inescapable recognition” upon speaking to the lord of the flies (p. 138)?

6. When referring to Jack, the twins say, “He—you know—goes” (p. 142). Why can’t they call Jack by name?

7. Why do the boys attack Simon? What does his death indicate about how the boys have changed?

8. Why don’t Jack and his hunters take the conch when they attack Ralph, Piggy, and Samneric (p. 168)?

9. Ralph argues that when they confront Jack and the hunters, they should go “washed and brushed” (p. 170). Explain the significance of appearance at this point in the novel.

10. Prior to his death, Piggy once again argues on the side of logic. What does his death signify?

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Jack will use rhetoric like asking who wants to have fun on the island as opposed to listening to Ralph and having to do chores. He will often imply his strength as opposed to Ralph's weakness.

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Jack will use rhetoric like asking who wants to have fun on the island as opposed to listening to Ralph and having to do chores. He will often imply his strength as opposed to Ralph's weakness.

Jack will use rhetoric like asking who wants to have fun on the island as opposed to listening to Ralph and having to do chores. He will often imply his strength as opposed to Ralph's weakness.