Lord of the Flies

How does the novel contribute to an understanding of sanity and of madness?

In chapter 5, golding writes “in a moment the platform was full of arguing gesticulating shadows- to ralph seated, this seemed the breaking up of sanity How is sanity defined? How does the novel contribute to an understanding of sanity and of madness? What are some other instances of madness in the novel?

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Golding calls hatred and savagery inherent in human nature. When left unchecked these traits fuel insanity on the island. The children de-evolve from British school-boys (military to savages. Hatred is part of this progression. Jack, in particular, feels an intense hatred for Ralph. It is not so much Ralph but what he thinks Ralph can take away from hi. Jack craves power. When Ralph is voted chief, Jack is mortified. Jack's "hate on" for Ralph stems from his own insecurities. This is contagious. Most of the boys internalize Jack's feelings. They do not Know why they have become snarling savages but hate is buried somewhere in there. Perhaps the most telling point in the novel is when Ralph asks Jack, "why do you hate me?" Jack can not answer because he doesn't know.