King Lear

References

Footnotes

  1. ^ http://www.bl.uk/treasures/shakespeare/kinglear.html
  2. ^ Taylor & Warren 1983.
  3. ^ Shaw and Wilson p.111.
  4. ^ Pathguy.com
  5. ^ http://www.rscshakespeare.co.uk/pdfs/Case_for_Folio.pdf Jonathan Bate The Case for the Folio
  6. ^ Kenneth Jackson, Language and History in Early Britain, Edinburgh, 1953 p. 459
  7. ^ Eilert Ekwall, English river-names, Clarendon Press, 1928, p. xlii.
  8. ^ Stevenson, W. H., "A note on the derivation of the name 'Leicester'", in: The Archaeological Journal, Volume 75, Royal Archaeological Institute, London, 1918, pp. 30–31
  9. ^ Soula Mitakidou and Anthony L. Manna, with Melpomeni Kanatsouli, Folktales from Greece: A Treasury of Delights, p 100 ISBN 1-56308-908-4; see also D. L. Ashliman, "Love Like Salt: folktales of types 923 and 510"
  10. ^ The Role of Edmund in King Lear
  11. ^ a b Harold Bloom. Bloom's Shakespeare Through the Ages: King Lear. Infobase Publishing, p.53, 2008.
  12. ^ Frank Kermode, 'King Lear', The Riverside Shakespeare (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1974), 1249.
  13. ^ R.A. Foakes, ed. King Lear. London: Arden, 1997, 89–90.
  14. ^ Kermode, Riverside, 1250.
  15. ^ Naseeb Shaheen Biblical References in Shakespeare's Plays (Newark, 1999, 2011), p. 606
  16. ^ The 1619 quarto is part of William Jaggard's so-called False Folio.
  17. ^ a b Harold Bloom. Bloom's Shakespeare Through the Ages: King Lear. Infobase Publishing, p.xii, 2008.
  18. ^ Shakespeare and Foakes p.107.
  19. ^ John Danby, Shakespeare's Doctrine of Nature: A Study of King Lear (London, 1949), p.50
  20. ^ Danby, p.151
  21. ^ Danby, p.50. For B. S. Stephan's summary of John Danby's Shakespeare's Doctrine of Nature: A Study of King Lear (1949), see CCHS.co.uk
  22. ^ Kahn, Coppèlia. "The Absent Mother in King Lear". Rewriting the Renaissance: The Discourses of Sexual Difference in Early Modern Europe. Eds. Margaret Ferguson, Maureen Quilligan, and Nancy Vickers. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 1986. p. 33-49.
  23. ^ Writings on Art and Literature by Sigmund Freud, Foreword by Neil Hertz, Stanford University Press (page 120)
  24. ^ McLaughlin, John. "The Dynamics of Power in King Lear: An Adlerian Interpretation." Shakespeare Quarterly 29 (1978): 39.
  25. ^ a b Harold Bloom. Shakespeare Through the Ages: King Lear, p. 317.
  26. ^ Peat, Derek (1982). "And That's True Too: King Lear and the Tension of Uncertainty", in Aspects of King Lear edited by Kenneth Muir and Stanley Wells. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 43–53. ISBN 978-0521288132. 
  27. ^ Bradley, A. C. (1991). Shakespearean Tragedy: Lectures on Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, and Macbeth. London: Penguin. p. 235. ISBN 978-0140530193. 
  28. ^ Reibetanz, John (1977). The Lear world : a study of King Lear in its dramatic context. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. p. 108. 
  29. ^ Holloway, John (2005). The Story of the Night: Studies in Shakespeare's Major Tragedies. New York: Routledge. ISBN 978-1138010338. 
  30. ^ Rosenberg, Marvin (1992). The Masks of King Lear. Newark DE: Univ of Delaware Press. ISBN 978-0874134858. 
  31. ^ Elton, William R. (1988). King Lear and the Gods. Lexington KY: University Press of Kentucky. p. 260. ISBN 978-0813101781. 
  32. ^ The Original Grimm Fairy Tales Translated by Oliver Loo, 2014, isbn 978-1-312-41904-9 http://www.theoriginalgrimm.com
  33. ^ Taylor, Gary (b) p.5
  34. ^ Thomson p.143; Taylor, Gary (b) p.6.
  35. ^ Shakespeare and Hunter p.45; Taylor, Gary (b) pp.18–19.
  36. ^ Gurr and Ichikawa, pp.53–54.
  37. ^ Marsden p.21.
  38. ^ Taylor, Michael pp.324–325.
  39. ^ Bradley pp.43
  40. ^ Armstrong p.312; Jackson (c) p.190.
  41. ^ Potter p.186; Marsden p.28.
  42. ^ Bradley pp.47.
  43. ^ Marsden p.28, citing Tate's Lear line 5.6.119.
  44. ^ Cited by Marsden p.30.
  45. ^ Tatspaugh p.528.
  46. ^ Marsden p.33
  47. ^ Marsden p.30, citing Gray's Inn Journal 12 January 1754.
  48. ^ Morrison p.232.
  49. ^ Moody p.40; Shakespeare and Hunter p.50.
  50. ^ Potter p.189.
  51. ^ Potter pp.190–191; Wells (b) p.62.
  52. ^ Potter pp.190–191.
  53. ^ Potter, p.191.
  54. ^ Gay p.161.
  55. ^ Wells (b) p.73.
  56. ^ Shakespeare and Hunter p.51.
  57. ^ Shakespeare and Foakes pp.30–31.
  58. ^ Potter p.191.
  59. ^ Schoch pp.58–75 and 67.
  60. ^ Potter p.193.
  61. ^ Jackson (c) p.206.
  62. ^ Schoch p.63; and see: [1].
  63. ^ O'Connor p.78.
  64. ^ Shakespeare and Foakes p.24.
  65. ^ Shakespeare and Foakes pp.36–37.
  66. ^ Shakespeare and Foakes p.52.
  67. ^ Quoted in Wells (b) p.224; Shakespeare and Foakes p.89.
  68. ^ According to Ronald Harwood, quoted in Wells (b) p.229.
  69. ^ Warren p.266.
  70. ^ a b Holland p.211.
  71. ^ Shakespeare and Foakes pp.27–28.
  72. ^ Holland p.213.
  73. ^ Dawson p.178.
  74. ^ Lan, p.532; Gillies, Minami Li and Trivedi p.265.
  75. ^ Gay p.171.
  76. ^ Beckerman, Jim (June 21, 2010). "Hudson Shakespeare Company takes "King Lear" outdoors". The Daily Record of Bergen County. 
  77. ^ a b "A 'King Lear' in need of a king ". The Globe and Mail, May 13, 2012.
  78. ^ Brode p.205
  79. ^ McKernan and Terris p.83
  80. ^ McKernan and Terris p.84; this version appears on the British Film Institute video compilation Silent Shakespeare (1999).
  81. ^ Brode pp.205–206.
  82. ^ The original title of this film is Cyrillic (Король Лир) and the sources anglicise it with different spellings. Rosenthal has Korol Lir, Brode has Karol Lear.
  83. ^ Brode p.206.
  84. ^ Pauline Kael's New Yorker review cited by Brode pp.206&209.
  85. ^ Both cited by Brode p.206.
  86. ^ Brode pp.206–207.
  87. ^ Brode pp.206–210, quotation p.207.
  88. ^ Rosenthal p.82.
  89. ^ Rosenthal p.83.
  90. ^ Cited by Brode p.211.
  91. ^ Rosenthal p.81
  92. ^ Brode pp.211–212.
  93. ^ Rosenthal pp.79–80; King Lear III iv 28.
  94. ^ Guntner pp.129–130.
  95. ^ McKernan and Terris pp.85–87.
  96. ^ McKernan and Terris pp.87–88.
  97. ^ Rosenthal p.84.
  98. ^ Guntner p.131; Rosenthal p.84.
  99. ^ Rosenthal pp.84–87; Jackson(b) p.225.
  100. ^ Griggs, Yvonne (2009). Screen Adaptations: Shakespeare's King Lear: A Close Study of the Relationship Between Text and Film. London: Methuen Drama. p. 122. ISBN 978-1-408-10592-4. 
  101. ^ McKernan and Terris pp.84–85.
  102. ^ McKernan and Terris p.85
  103. ^ McKernan and Terris p.87
  104. ^ Howard p.308.
  105. ^ a b Howard p.299.
  106. ^ Rosenthal p.88.
  107. ^ Rosenthal pp.88–89; Brode p.217.
  108. ^ Rosenthal pp.90–91; Lehmann pp.72–89.
  109. ^ Rosenthal pp.92–93.
  110. ^ Greenhalgh and Shaughnessy p.99.

Secondary sources

  • Armstrong, Alan Unfamiliar Shakespeare in Wells and Orlin pp. 308–319.
  • Bradley, Lynne (2010). Adapting King Lear for the Stage. Ashgate. ISBN 978-1-4094-0597-9. 
  • Brode, Douglas (2001). Shakespeare in the Movies: From the Silent Era to Today. Berkley Boulevard. ISBN 0-425-18176-6. 
  • Burnett, Mark Thornton; Ramona Wray (2006). Screening Shakespeare in the Twenty-First Century. Edinburgh University Press. ISBN 978-0-7486-2351-8. 
  • Burt, Richard Backstage Pass(ing): Stage Beauty, Othello and the Make-up of Race in Burnett and Wray pp. 53–71.
  • Dawson, Anthony B. International Shakespeare in Wells and Stanton pp. 174–193.
  • deGrazia, Margreta; Stanley Wells (2001). The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-65881-0. 
  • Gay, Penny Women and Shakespearean Performance in Wells and Stanton pp. 155–173.
  • Gillies, John & Ryuta Minami, Ruri Li and Poonam Trivedi Shakespeare on the Stages of Asia in Wells and Stanton pp. 259–283.
  • Greenhalgh, Susan and Robert Shaughnessy Our Shakespeares: British Television and the Strains of Multiculturalism in Burnett and Wray pp. 90–112.
  • Guntner, J. Lawrence Hamlet, Macbeth and King Lear on Film in Jackson (a) pp. 117–134, especially the section King Lear: A Play For Our Times pp. 128–132.
  • Gurr, Andrew; Mariko Ichikawa (2000). Oxford Shakespeare Topics: Staging in Shakespeare's Theatres. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-871158-2. 
  • Hodgdon, Barbara; W. B. Worthen (2005). A Companion to Shakespeare and Performance. Blackwell Publishing. ISBN 978-1-4051-8821-0. 
  • Holland, Peter Shakespeare in the Twentieth-Century Theatre in deGrazia and Wells pp. 199–215.
  • Howard, Tony Shakespeare's Cinematic Offshoots in Jackson (a) pp. 295–313.
  • Jackson, Russell (a) (2000). The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare on Film. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-63975-1. 
  • Keenan, Siobhan. Acting Companies and Their Plays in Shakespeare's London. London: Arden, 2014. 86-92.
  • Jackson, Russell (b) Shakespeare and the Cinema in deGrazia and Wells pp. 217–233.
  • Jackson, Russell (c) Shakespeare on the Stage from 1660 to 1900 in Wells (a) pp. 187–212.
  • Lan, Yong Li Shakespeare and the Fiction of the Intercultural in Hodgdon and Worthen pp. 527–549.
  • Lehmann, Courtney The Postnostalgic Renaissance: The 'Place' of Liverpool in Don Boyd's My Kingdom in Burnett and Wray pp. 72–89.
  • Marsden, Jean I. Improving Shakespeare: from the Restoration to Garrick in Wells and Stanton pp. 21–36.
  • McKernan, Luke; Olwen Terris (1994). Walking Shadows: Shakespeare in the National Film and Television Archive. British Film Institute. ISBN 0-85170-486-7. 
  • Moody, Jane Romantic Shakespeare in Wells and Stanton pp. 37–57.
  • Potter, Lois Shakespeare in the Theatre, 1660–1900 in deGrazia and Wells pp. 183–198.
  • Rosenthal, Daniel (2007). 100 Shakespeare Films. British Film Institute. ISBN 978-1-84457-170-3. 
  • Schoch, Richard W. Pictorial Shakespeare in Wells and Stanton pp. 58–75.
  • Shakespeare, William (1997). R. A. Foakes, ed. King Lear. The Arden Shakespeare (Third Series) Methuen Drama. ISBN 978-1-903436-59-2. 
  • Shakespeare, William (1972–1996). G. K. Hunter, ed. King Lear. New Penguin Shakespeare. 
  • Shaw, George Bernard and Edwin Wilson (ed.) Shaw on Shakespeare (1961) Applause ISBN 1-55783-561-6
  • Tatspaugh, Patricia Performance History: Shakespeare on the Stage 1660–2001 in Wells and Orlin pp. 525–549.
  • Taylor, Gary (a); Warren, Michael, eds. (1983). The Division of the Kingdoms: Shakespeare's Two Versions of King Lear. Oxford: Clarendon Press. ISBN 978-0-19-812950-9. 
  • Taylor, Gary (b) Shakespeare Plays on Renaissance Stages in Wells and Stanton pp. 1–20.
  • Taylor, Michael The Critical Tradition in Wells and Orlin pp. 323–332.
  • Thomson, Peter The Comic Actor and Shakespeare in Wells and Stanton pp. 137–154.
  • Warren, Roger Shakespeare on the Twentieth-Century Stage in Wells (a) pp. 257–272.
  • Wells, Stanley (a) (1986). The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare Studies. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-31841-6. 
  • Wells, Stanley (b) (1997). Oxford Shakespeare Topics: Shakespeare in the Theatre, An Anthology of Criticism. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-871176-6. 
  • Wells, Stanley; Lena Cowen Orlin (2003). Shakespeare: An Oxford Guide. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-924522-3. 
  • Wells, Stanley; Sarah Stanton (2002). The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare on Stage. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-79711-X. 

This content is from Wikipedia. GradeSaver is providing this content as a courtesy until we can offer a professionally written study guide by one of our staff editors. We do not consider this content professional or citable. Please use your discretion when relying on it.