I Am Malala

Reception in Pakistan

Reception at home has been somewhat more mixed. Dawn columnist Huma Yusuf summarized three main complaints of Yousafzai's critics: "Her fame highlights Pakistan's most negative aspect (rampant militancy); her education campaign echoes Western agendas; and the West's admiration of her is hypocritical because it overlooks the plight of other innocent victims, like the casualties of U.S. drone strikes."[112] Another Dawn journalist, Cyril Almeida, addressed the public's lack of rage against the Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), blaming the failing state government.[131] Journalist Assed Baig described her as being used to justify Western imperialism as "the perfect candidate for the white man to relieve his burden and save the native".[111] Yousafzai was also accused on social media of being a CIA spy.[111] Although some voices are low in tone but there are supporters of Malala in Pakistani media. Farman Nawaz, a freelance Pakistani columnist, argues that Malala would have gained more fame in Pakistan if she belonged to the province of Punjab. His opinion was not given importance by the mainstream media of Pakistan but his somewhat similar views in this regard were published by Daily Outlook Afghanistan.[132]


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