Herman Melville: Poems

References

  1. ^ Williams (1956), 231
  2. ^ Parker (1996), 23
  3. ^ Genealogical chart in Parker (2002), 926–929
  4. ^ Delbanco (2005), 19
  5. ^ Delbanco (2005), 17
  6. ^ Parker (1996), 12
  7. ^ Parker (1996), 7
  8. ^ Parker (1996), 24
  9. ^ Parker (1996), 22
  10. ^ a b Parker (1996), 39
  11. ^ a b Delbanco (2005), 23
  12. ^ Parker (1996), 52
  13. ^ Parker (1996), 27
  14. ^ Cited in Sealts (1988), 17
  15. ^ Parker (1996), 35 and 38
  16. ^ a b Sealts (1988), 17
  17. ^ Parker (1996), 38–39
  18. ^ Cited in Parker (1996), 48
  19. ^ Sullivan 117
  20. ^ Titus (1980), 4–10
  21. ^ a b Parker (1996), 56
  22. ^ Sealts (1988), 18
  23. ^ Parker (1996), 56–57
  24. ^ Delbanco (2005), 24
  25. ^ Cited in Parker (1996), 57
  26. ^ Parker (1996), 58
  27. ^ Parker (1996), 63
  28. ^ a b Parker (1996), 68
  29. ^ Parker (1996), 76–78
  30. ^ Parker (1996), 82
  31. ^ a b Parker (1996), 95
  32. ^ Delbanco (2005), 25
  33. ^ Parker (1996), 97
  34. ^ Parker (1996), 98
  35. ^ Parker (1996), 107
  36. ^ Parker (1996), 108–9
  37. ^ Parker (1996), 110
  38. ^ Parker (1996), 117
  39. ^ Parker (1996), 112 and 124
  40. ^ Parker (1996), 126
  41. ^ Delbanco (2005), 26
  42. ^ Parker (1996), 126, 128–9
  43. ^ Parker (1996), 136–7
  44. ^ a b Parker (1996), 138
  45. ^ a b Sealts (1988), 16
  46. ^ Delbanco (2005), 27
  47. ^ Parker (1996), 143
  48. ^ See Redburn, pg. 82: "For sailors are of three classes able-seamen, ordinary-seamen, and boys... In merchant-ships, a boy means a green-hand, a landsman on his first voyage."
  49. ^ Parker (1996), 176-8
  50. ^ Parker (1996), 181
  51. ^ a b Parker (1996), 185
  52. ^ Parker (1996), 184
  53. ^ Miller, 5
  54. ^ a b Milder (1988), 430
  55. ^ a b Delbanco (2005), 66
  56. ^ a b c Milder (1988), 431
  57. ^ Parker (1996), 614
  58. ^ Milder (1988), 432
  59. ^ Delbanco (2005), 124
  60. ^ Bezanson (1986), 180.
  61. ^ In an essay on Hawthorne's Mosses in the Literary Review (August 1850), Melville wrote:

    To what infinite height of loving wonder and admiration I may yet be borne, when by repeatedly banquetting on these Mosses, I shall have thoroughly incorporated their whole stuff into my being,--that, I can not tell. But already I feel that this Hawthorne has dropped germinous seeds into my soul. He expands and deepens down, the more I contemplate him; and further, and further, shoots his strong New-England roots into the hot soil of my Southern soul.

  62. ^ Cheever(2006), 196
  63. ^ Parker (1996), 870–871
  64. ^ Parker (1996), 131–132
  65. ^ Parker (2002), 155
  66. ^ Parker (2002), 243
  67. ^ Nathaniel Hawthorne, entry for 20 November 1856, in The English Notebooks, (1853–1858)
  68. ^ Robertson-Lorant (1996), 375–400
  69. ^ Branch (1997), 369ff.)
  70. ^ Kennedy, Frederick James (March 1977). "Herman Melville's Lecture in Montreal". The New England Quarterly 50 (1): 125–137. doi:10.2307/364707. Retrieved 4 April 2012. 
  71. ^ Hutchins, Zach (2014). "Herman Melville's Fejee Mermaid, or a Confidence Man at the Lycuem" (PDF). ESQ 60 (1): 75–109. doi:10.1353/esq.2014.0004. 
  72. ^ a b Milder (1988), 442
  73. ^ Collected Poems of Herman Melville, Ed. Howard P. Vincent. Chicago: Packard & Company and Hendricks House (1947), 446.
  74. ^ Leyda, Jay (1969). The Melville Log 2. New York: Gordian Press. p. 730. quietly declining offers of money for special services, quietly returning money which has been thrust into his pockets 
  75. ^ a b Milder (1988), 443
  76. ^ p. 287, Andrew Delbanco (2005), Melville: His World and Work. New York: Knopf. ISBN 0-375-40314-0
  77. ^ Parker (2002), 888
  78. ^ Milder (1988), 445
  79. ^ Delbanco (2005), 319
  80. ^ Parker (2002), 921
  81. ^ Sealts (1987), 461
  82. ^ Berthoff (1962), 176
  83. ^ a b c Berthoff (1962), 177
  84. ^ Berthoff (1962), 179
  85. ^ a b Bezanson (1986), 203
  86. ^ Berthoff (1962), 163
  87. ^ Berthoff (1962), 164
  88. ^ Berthoff (1962), 165
  89. ^ a b Berthoff (1962), 170
  90. ^ Berthoff (1962), 175
  91. ^ Berthoff (1962), 173
  92. ^ Wright (1949), 168
  93. ^ Wright (1940), 196 n. 59
  94. ^ Bercaw (1987), 10
  95. ^ Wright (1940), 196–197
  96. ^ Wright (1949), 137
  97. ^ Wright (1949), 139–141
  98. ^ Wright (1949), 145–6
  99. ^ a b Matthiessen (1941), 424
  100. ^ Matthiessen (1941), 426
  101. ^ Matthiessen (1941). 425
  102. ^ Matthiessen (1941), 428
  103. ^ Matthiessen (1941), 428-9
  104. ^ Matthiessen (1941), 430
  105. ^ Mathiessen (1941), 430-431
  106. ^ Matthiessen (1941), 431
  107. ^ a b Wright (1940), 198
  108. ^ Delbanco, 7
  109. ^ Delbanco, 294
  110. ^ Marovitz (2007), p. 517-519.
  111. ^ Nathalia Wright, "Melville and STW at Yale: Studies under Stanley T. Williams". Melville Society Extracts, 70 (September 1987), 1–4.
  112. ^ Spark, Clare L. (2006). Hunting Captain Ahab: Psychological Warfare and the Melville Revival. Kent, Ohio: Kent State Univ. Press. ISBN 0873388887. , p. 238.
  113. ^ Lawrence Buell, “Melville The Poet,” in Robert Levine, ed., The Cambridge Companion to Melville (Cambridge University Press, 1998), p. 135.
  114. ^ Renker, Elizabeth (Spring–Summer 2000). "Melville the Poet: Response to William Spengemann". American Literary History 12 (1&2). Retrieved 29 September 2011. 
  115. ^ Spanos, William V. (2009). Herman Melville and the American Calling: The Fiction After Moby-Dick, 1851–1857. SUNY Press. p. 54. ISBN 978-0-7914-7563-8. 
  116. ^ Chapin, Henry Introduction John Marr & Other Poems kindle ebook ASIN B0084B7NOC
  117. ^ Melville, Herman (1995). "Introduction". In Helen Vendler. Selected Poems of Herman Melville. San Francisco: Arion Press. pp. xxv. 
  118. ^ Serlin, David Harley. "The Dialogue of Gender in Melville's The Paradise of Bachelors and the Tartarus of Maids," Modern Language Studies 25.2 (1995): 80–87. Note: These two writings are separate but often read together for the full effect of Melville's purpose. In both these works many phallic symbols are represented (such as the swords and snuff powder which represented a lack of semen in the bachelors.) Not only this, but in the 'Tartarus of Maids' there was a detailed description of how the main character arrived at the 'Tartarus of Maids.' This description was intended to resemble that of the vaginal canal.
  119. ^ James Creech, Closet writing: The case of Melville's Pierre, 1993
  120. ^ a b c d e f g Rosenberg, 70–78
  121. ^ see Delblanco, Andrew. American Literary History, 1992
  122. ^ Sandberg, Alvin. "Erotic Patterns in 'The Paradise of Bachelors and the Tartarus of Maids', " Literature and Psychology 18.1 (1968): 2–8.
  123. ^ Serlin, David Harley. "The Dialogue of Gender in Melville's The Paradise of Bachelors and the Tartarus of Maids," Modern Language Studies 25.2 (1995): 80–87
  124. ^ Melville, Herman. Mardi, ed. Tyrus Hillway. New Haven: College and University Press, 1973. p. 132.
  125. ^ Melville, Herman. Pierre, New York: Grove Press, 1957. p. 151.
  126. ^ E. Haviland Miller, Melville, New York, 1975.
  127. ^ Weisberg, Richard H. The Failure of the Word: The Lawyer as Protagonist in Modern Fiction (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1989), chapters 8 and 9.
  128. ^ Sealts (1987), 462
  129. ^ a b c Wright (1949), 77
  130. ^ HERBERT MITGANG (1985-05-12). "VOYAGING FAR AND WIDE IN SEARCH OF MELVILLE". The New York Times. Retrieved 2011-03-15. 
  131. ^ Janet Fang (2010-06-30). "Call me Leviathan melvillei". Nature. Retrieved 2010-06-30. 
  132. ^ Pallab Ghosh (2010-06-30). "'Sea monster' whale fossil unearthed". BBC. Retrieved 2010-06-30. 
  133. ^ [1]

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