Henry V

Adaptations

Film

There have been three major film adaptations. The first, directed by and starring Laurence Olivier in 1944, is a colourful and highly stylised version which begins in the Globe Theatre and then gradually shifts to a realistic evocation of the Battle of Agincourt.[16] Olivier's film was made during the Second World War and was intended as a patriotic rallying cry at the time of the invasion of Normandy.[16]

The second major film, directed by and starring Kenneth Branagh in 1989, attempts to give a more realistic evocation of the period and lays more emphasis on the horrors of war. It features a mud-spattered and gruesome Battle of Agincourt. Where Olivier staged the comic scenes as comedy, Branagh played them as serious drama.

The third major film, starring Tom Hiddleston, was made by the BBC in 2012 as part of The Hollow Crown series.

Dance

In 2004, post-modern choreographer David Gordon created a dance-theatre version of the play called Dancing Henry Five, which mixed William Walton's music written for the Olivier film, recorded speeches from the film itself and by Christopher Plummer, and commentary written by Gordon. The piece premiered at Danspace Project in New York, where it was compared favorably to a production of Henry IV (parts 1 and 2) at Lincoln Center.[17] It has been revived three times – in 2005, 2007 and 2011 – playing cities across the United States, and received a National Endowment for the Arts American Masterpieces in Dance Award.[18]

Music

Suite from Henry V is a 1963 orchestral arrangement of music that composer William Walton wrote for the 1944 Olivier film of Henry V. The arrangement is by Muir Mathiesson, and is in five movements.[19]

Henry V - A Shakespeare Scenario is a 50-minute work for narrator, SATB chorus, boys' choir (optional) and full orchestra.[20] The musical content is taken from Walton's score for the Olivier film of Henry V, edited by David Lloyd-Jones and arranged by Christopher Palmer.[21] It was first performed at the Royal Festival Hall in London, in May of 1990. Performers for this premiere were Christopher Palmer (narrator), the Academy Chorus, Choristers of Westminster Cathedral, and Academy of St Martin-in-the-Fields. The conductor was Sir Neville Marriner. A CD of the work with these performers was released by Chandos is 1990.[22]

O For a Muse of Fire is a symphonic overture for full orchestra and vocal soloist, written by Darryl Kubian. The work is 12 minutes long, and was premiered by the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra in March, 2015.[23][24] The work is scored for full orchestra, with vocal soloist. The vocal part incorporates select lines from the text, and the vocal range is adaptable to different voice types. The soloist for the premiere performances with the New Jersey Symphony was former October Project lead singer (and former Sony Classical artist) Mary Fahl.


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