Hans Christian Andersen: Fairy Tales

Legacy and cultural influence

Archives, collections, and museums

  • The Hans Christian Andersen Museum in Solvang, California, a city founded by Danes, is devoted to presenting the author's life and works. Displays include models of Andersen's childhood home and of "The Princess and the Pea". The museum also contains hundreds of volumes of Andersen's works, including many illustrated first editions.[26]
  • The Library of Congress Rare Book and Special Collections Division was bequeathed an extensive collection of Andersen materials by the Danish-American actor, Jean Hersholt.[27] Of particular note is an original scrapbook Andersen prepared for the young Jonas Drewsen.[28]

Art, entertainment, and media

Films

  • "La petite marchande d'allumettes" (1928; in English: The Little Match Girl), film by Jean Renoir [29] based on "The Little Match Girl"
  • Andersen was played by Joachim Gottschalk in the German film The Swedish Nightingale (1941), which portrays his relationship with the singer Jenny Lind.
  • Hans Christian Andersen (1952), an American musical film starring Danny Kaye that, though inspired by Andersen's life and literary legacy, was meant to be neither historically nor biographically accurate; it begins by saying, "This is not the story of his life, but a fairy tale about this great spinner of fairy tales"
  • The Rankin/Bass Productions-produced fantasy film, The Daydreamer (1966), depicts the young Hans Christian Andersen imaginatively conceiving the stories he would later write.
  • The World of Hans Christian Andersen (1968), a Japanese anime fantasy film from Toei Doga, based on the works of Danish author Hans Christian Andersen
  • Frozen (2013), a movie produced by Disney loosely based on "The Snow Queen"

Literature

Andersen's stories laid the groundwork for other children's classics, such as The Wind in the Willows (1908) by Kenneth Grahame and Winnie-the-Pooh (1926) by A.A. Milne. The technique of making inanimate objects, such as toys, come to life ("Little Ida's Flowers") would later also be used by Lewis Carroll and Beatrix Potter.

  • "Match Girl," a short story by Anne Bishop (published in Ruby Slippers, Golden Tears)
  • "The Chrysanthemum Robe", a short story by Kara Dalkey (based on "The Emperor's New Clothes" and published in The Armless Maiden)
  • The Nightingale by Kara Dalkey, lyrical adult fantasy novel set in the courts of old Japan
  • The Girl Who Trod on a Loaf by Kathryn Davis, a contemporary novel about fairy tales and opera
  • "Sparks", a short story by Gregory Frost (based on "The Tinder Box", published in Black Swan, White Raven)
  • "The Pangs of Love", a short story by Jane Gardam (based on "The Little Mermaid", published in Close Company: Stories of Mothers and Daughters)
  • "The Last Poems About the Snow Queen," a poem cycle by Sandra Gilbert (published in Blood Pressure).
  • The Snow Queen by Eileen Kernaghan, a gentle Young Adult fantasy novel that brings out the tale's subtle pagan and shamanic elements
  • The Wild Swans by Peg Kerr, a novel that brings Andersen's fairy tale to colonial and modern America
  • "Steadfast", a short story by Nancy Kress (based on "The Steadfast Tin Soldier", published in Black Swan, White Raven)
  • "In the Witch's Garden" (October 2002), a short story by Naomi Kritzer (based on "The Snow Queen", published in Realms of Fantasy magazine)
  • Daughter of the Forest by Juliet Marillier, a romantic fantasy novel, set in early Ireland (thematically linked to "The Wild Swans")
  • "The Snow Queen", a short story by Patricia A. McKillip (published in Snow White, Blood Red)
  • "You, Little Match Girl," a short story by Joyce Carol Oates (published in Black Heart, Ivory Bones)
  • "The Real Princess," a short story by Susan Palwick (based on "The Princess and the Pea", published in Ruby Slippers, Golden Tears)
  • "The Naked King" ("Голый Король (Goliy Korol)" 1937), "The Shadow" ("Тень (Ten)" 1940), and "The Snow Queen" ("Снежная Королева (Sniezhenaya Koroleva)" 1948) by Eugene Schwartz, reworked and adapted to the contemporary reality plays by one of Russia's playwrights. Schwartz's versions of "The Shadow" and "The Snow Queen" were later made into movies (1971 and 1966, respectively).
  • "The Sea Hag," a short story by Melissa Lee Shaw (based on "The Little Mermaid", published in Silver Birch, Blood Moon)
  • The Snow Queen by Joan D. Vinge, an award-winning novel that reworks "The Snow Queen"'s themes into epic science fiction
  • "The Steadfast Tin Soldier," a short story by Joan D. Vinge (published in Women of Wonder)

Monuments and sculptures

Statue in Central Park, New York commemorating Andersen and The Ugly Duckling 
Andersen statue at the Rosenborg Castle Gardens, Copenhagen 
Statue in Odense being led out to the harbour during a public exhibition 
Odense statue half submerged in the water 
Statue in Solvang, California, a city built by Danish immigrants. 
Statue in Bratislava, Slovakia 
  • Hans Christian Andersen (1880), even before his death, steps had already been taken to erect, in Andersen's honor, a large statue by sculptor August Saabye, which can now be seen in the Rosenborg Castle Gardens in Copenhagen.[3]
  • Hans Christian Andersen (1896) by the Danish sculptor Johannes Gelert, at Lincoln Park in Chicago, on Stockton Drive near Webster Avenue[30]
  • Hans Christian Andersen (1956), a statue by sculptor Georg J. Lober and designer Otto Frederick Langman, at Central Park Lake in New York City, opposite East 74th Street (40.7744306°N, 73.9677972°W)

Music

  • Hans Christian Andersen (album), a 1994 album by Franciscus Henri
  • The Song is a Fairytale (Sangen er et Eventyr), a song cycle based on fairy tales by Hans Christian Andersen, composed by Frederik Magle

Stage productions

  • Sam the Lovesick Snowman at the Center for Puppetry Arts: a contemporary puppet show by Jon Ludwig inspired by The Snow Man.[31]
  • Striking Twelve, a modern musical take on "The Little Match Girl", created and performed by GrooveLily.Template:Http://www.groovelily.com/musicals/striking-12/

Television

  • Hans Christian Andersen: My Life as a Fairytale (2001), a semi-biographical television miniseries that fictionalizes the young life of Danish author Hans Christian Andersen and includes fairytales as short interludes, intertwined into the events of the young author's life
  • In the "Metal Fish" episode of the Disney TV series The Little Mermaid, Andersen is a vital character whose inspiration for writing his tale is shown to have been granted by an encounter with the show's protagonists

Webseries

  • Classic Alice (2014), a YouTube webseries, had a five-episode arc based on "The Butterfly"

Awards

  • Hans Christian Andersen Awards, prizes awarded annually by the International Board on Books for Young People to an author and illustrator whose complete works have made lasting contributions to children's literature.[32]
  • Hans Christian Andersen Literature Award, a Danish literary award established in 2010

Events and holidays

  • Andersen's birthday, 2 April, is celebrated as International Children's Book Day.[33]
  • The year 2005, designated "Andersen Year" in Denmark,[34] was the bicentenary of Andersen's birth, and his life and work was celebrated around the world.
  • In Denmark, a well-attended "once in a lifetime" show was staged in Copenhagen's Parken Stadium during "Andersen Year" to celebrate the writer and his stories.[34]
  • The annual H.C. Andersen Marathon, established in 2000, is held in Odense, Denmark

Places named after Andersen

  • Hans Christian Andersen Airport, small airport servicing the Danish city of Odense
  • Instituto Hans Christian Andersen, Chilean high school located in San Fernando, Colchagua Province, Chile

Postage stamps

  • Andersen's legacy includes the postage stamps of Denmark and of Kazakhstan depicted above, depicting Andersen's profile.

Theme parks

  • A $13-million theme park based on Andersen's tales and life opened in Shanghai at the end of 2006.[35] Multi-media games and cultural contests related to the fairy tales are available to visitors. Andersen is said to have been celebrated because he was "a nice, hardworking person who was not afraid of poverty".[35]
  • The Japanese city of Funabashi also has a children's theme park named after Andersen.[36]

This content is from Wikipedia. GradeSaver is providing this content as a courtesy until we can offer a professionally written study guide by one of our staff editors. We do not consider this content professional or citable. Please use your discretion when relying on it.