Hamlet

References

Notes

All references to Hamlet, unless otherwise specified, are taken from the Arden Shakespeare Q2 (Thompson and Taylor, 2006a). Under their referencing system, 3.1.55 means act 3, scene 1, line 55. References to the First Quarto and First Folio are marked Hamlet Q1 and Hamlet F1, respectively, and are taken from the Arden Shakespeare "Hamlet: the texts of 1603 and 1623" (Thompson and Taylor, 2006b). Their referencing system for Q1 has no act breaks, so 7.115 means scene 7, line 115.

  1. ^ Thompson and Taylor (2006a, 74).
  2. ^ a b Taylor (2002, 18).
  3. ^ Crystal and Crystal (2005, 66).
  4. ^ Thompson and Taylor (2006a, 17).
  5. ^ a b See Taylor (2002, 4); Banham (1998, 141); Hattaway asserts that "Richard Burbage ... played Hieronimo and also Richard III but then was the first Hamlet, Lear, and Othello" (1982, 91); Peter Thomson argues that the identity of Hamlet as Burbage is built into the dramaturgy of several moments of the play: "we will profoundly misjudge the position if we do not recognise that, whilst this is Hamlet talking about the groundlings, it is also Burbage talking to the groundlings" (1983, 24); see also Thomson on the first player's beard (1983, 110).
  6. ^ Hamlet 1.4.
  7. ^ Hamlet I.5.195.
  8. ^ Hamlet 2.1.99.
  9. ^ a b The Gravedigger Scene: Hamlet 5.1.1–205.
  10. ^ Saxo and Hansen (1983, 36–37).
  11. ^ Saxo and Hansen (1983, 16–25).
  12. ^ Saxo and Hansen (1983, 5–15).
  13. ^ Books 3 & 4 – see online text
  14. ^ Saxo and Hansen (1983, 1–5).
  15. ^ Saxo and Hansen (1983, 25–37).
  16. ^ Edwards (1985, 1–2).
  17. ^ Saxo and Hansen (1983, 66–67).
  18. ^ Jenkins (1982, 82–85).
  19. ^ Saxo and Hansen (1983, 67).
  20. ^ In his 1936 book The Problem of Hamlet: A Solution Andrew Cairncross asserted that the Hamlet referred to in 1589 was written by Shakespeare; Peter Alexander (1964), Eric Sams (according to Jackson 1991, 267) and, more recently, Harold Bloom (2001, xiii and 383; 2003, 154) have agreed. Harold Jenkins, the editor of the second series Arden edition of the play, dismisses the idea as groundless (1982, 84 n4).
  21. ^ Saxo and Hansen (1983, 66–68).
  22. ^ Saxo and Hansen (1983, 6).
  23. ^ Greenblatt (2004a, 311); Greenblatt (2004b).
  24. ^ Shakespeare's Last Will and Testament.
  25. ^ Chambers (1930) 418: J.D. Wilson (1932) 104: Rowse (1963) 323.
  26. ^ Lilian Winstanley, Hamlet and the Scottish Succession, Cambridge University Press, 1921, 114.
  27. ^ H.Jenkins (ed.) Hamlet, Methuen, 1982, p.142.
  28. ^ Polonius was close to the Latin name for Robert Pullen, founder of Oxford University, and Reynaldo too close for safety to John Rainolds, the President of Corpus Christi College. G.R.Hibbard (ed.) Hamlet, Oxford University Press, 1987, pp.74–5.
  29. ^ MacCary suggests 1599 or 1600 (1998, 13); James Shapiro offers late 1600 or early 1601 (2005, 341); Wells and Taylor suggest that the play was written in 1600 and revised later (1988, 653); the New Cambridge editor settles on mid-1601 (Edwards 1985, 8); the New Swan Shakespeare Advanced Series editor agrees with 1601 (Lott 1970, xlvi); Thompson and Taylor, tentatively ("according to whether one is the more persuaded by Jenkins or by Honigmann") suggest a terminus ad quem of either Spring 1601 or sometime in 1600 (2001a, 58–59).
  30. ^ MacCary (1998, 12–13) and Edwards (1985, 5–6).
  31. ^ a b Lott (1970, xlvi).
  32. ^ Hamlet F1 2.2.337. The whole conversation between Rozencrantz, Guildenstern and Hamlet concerning the touring players' departure from the city is at Hamlet "F1" 2.2.324–360.
  33. ^ Duncan-Jones, Catherine (2001). "Do the boys carry it away?". Ungentle Shakespeare: scenes from his life. London: Arden Shakespeare. pp. 143–9. ISBN 1-903436-26-5. 
  34. ^ Edwards (1985, 5).
  35. ^ Hattaway (1987, 13–20).
  36. ^ Chambers (1923, vol. 3, 486–487) and Halliday (1964, 204–205).
  37. ^ Thompson and Taylor (2006a, 465).
  38. ^ Halliday (1964, 204).
  39. ^ a b Thompson and Taylor (2006a, 78).
  40. ^ Hibbard (1987, 22–23).
  41. ^ Hattaway (1987, 16).
  42. ^ Thompson and Taylor published Q2, with appendices, in their first volume (2006a) and the F1 and Q1 texts in their second volume (2006b). Bate and Rasmussen (2007) is the F1 text with additional Q2 passages in an appendix. The New Cambridge series has begun to publish separate volumes for the separate quarto versions that exist of Shakespeare's plays (Irace 1998).
  43. ^ Hamlet 3.4 and 4.1.
  44. ^ Thompson and Taylor (2006a, 543–552).
  45. ^ Jenkins (1982, 14).
  46. ^ Hamlet Q1 14.
  47. ^ Jackson (1986, 171).
  48. ^ Irace (1998); Thompson and Taylor (2006a, 85–86).
  49. ^ Thompson and Taylor (2006b, 36–37) and Checklist of Q1 Productions in Thompson and Taylor (2006b, 38–39).
  50. ^ Wofford (1994) and Kirsch (1968).
  51. ^ Vickers (1974a, 447) and (1974b, 92).
  52. ^ Wofford (1994, 184–185).
  53. ^ Vickers (1974c, 5).
  54. ^ Wofford (1994, 185).
  55. ^ a b Wofford (1994, 186).
  56. ^ Rosenberg (1992, 179).
  57. ^ MacCary (1998, 67–72, 84).
  58. ^ Based on the length of the first edition of The Riverside Shakespeare (1974).
  59. ^ Also used in Love's Labour's Lost and A Midsummer Night's Dream. Kermode (2000, 256).
  60. ^ Adamson, Sylvia; Hunter, Lynette; Magnusson, Lynne; Thompson, Ann; Wales, Katie (1 Oct 2010). Arden Shakespeare: Reading Shakespeare's Dramatic Language. Los Angeles: Arden. ISBN 978-1-903436-29-5. 
  61. ^ MacCary (1998, 84–85).
  62. ^ Hamlet 3.1.63–64.
  63. ^ Hamlet 1.2.85–86.
  64. ^ MacCary (1998, 89–90).
  65. ^ Hamlet 3.1.87–148 especially lines 120, 129, 136, 139 and 148.
  66. ^ This is widely interpreted as having a double meaning, since 'nunnery' was slang for a brothel. Pauline Kiernan, Filthy Shakespeare, Quercus, 2006, p. 34. This interpretation has been challenged by Jenkins (1982, 493–495; also H. D. F. Kitto) on the grounds of insufficient and inconclusive evidence of a precedent for this meaning; Jenkins states that the literal meaning is better suited to the dramatic context.
  67. ^ Oxford English Dictionary (2004, CD).
  68. ^ Hamlet 2.1.63–65.
  69. ^ Hamlet 3.1.151 and 3.1.154. The Nunnery Scene: Hamlet 3.1.87–160.
  70. ^ MacCary (1998, 87–88).
  71. ^ Pauline Kiernan, Filthy Shakespeare: Shakespeare's Most Outrageous Sexual Puns, Quercus, 2006, p.34
  72. ^ MacCary (1998, 37–38); in the New Testament, see Romans 12:19: " 'vengeance is mine, I will repay' sayeth the Lord".
  73. ^ MacCary (1998, 38).
  74. ^ Asimov, Asimov's Guide to Shakespeare(1970, 92)
  75. ^ Hamlet F1 2.2.247–248.
  76. ^ MacCary (1998, 47–48).
  77. ^ Hamlet 3.1.55–87 especially line 55.
  78. ^ MacCary (1998, 49).
  79. ^ Knowles (1999, 1049 and 1052–1053) cited by Thompson and Taylor (2006a, 73–74); MacCary (1998, 49).
  80. ^ Hamlet Act II, scene 2 "and indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition; that this goodly frame the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory; this most excellent canopy the air, look you, this brave o'er hanging firmament, this majestical roof, fretted with golden fire: why, it appeareth no other thing to me, than a foul and pestilent congregation of vapours. 'What a piece of work is a man! How noble in reason, how infinite in faculty! In form and moving how express and admirable! In action how like an Angel! in apprehension how like a god! The beauty of the world! The paragon of animals! And yet to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me; no, nor Woman neither; though by your smiling you seem to say so"
  81. ^ http://www.dominiopublico.gov.br/pesquisa/DetalheObraForm.do?select_action=&co_obra=110021
  82. ^ https://digitalseance.files.wordpress.com/2010/07/32288747-schopenhauer-the-world-as-will-and-representation-v1.pdf page 266-267
  83. ^ a b Freud (1900, 367).
  84. ^ a b c d e Britton (1995, 207–211).
  85. ^ Freud (1900, 368).
  86. ^ The nunnery conversation referred to in this sentence is Hamlet 3.1.87–160.
  87. ^ Allan, Davin (1 May 2013). "Sexual Indifference in Shakespeare's Hamlet". Literatured. Retrieved 29 March 2014. 
  88. ^ Morrison (1997: 4; 129–30)
  89. ^ Cotsell (2005: 191)
  90. ^ The American Journal of Psychology 21.1 (January, 1910): 72–113.
  91. ^ The Closet Scene: Hamlet 3.4.
  92. ^ MacCary (1998, 104–107, 113–116) and de Grazia (2007, 168–170).
  93. ^ Smallwood (2002, 102).
  94. ^ Harold Bloom, Shakespeare Through the Ages: Hamlet. 2008. Infobase Publishing, New York, N.Y.
  95. ^ Hamlet 4.5.
  96. ^ Wofford (1994, 199–202).
  97. ^ Howard (2003, 411–415).
  98. ^ Heilbrun (1957)
  99. ^ Bloom (2003, 58–59); Thompson (2001, 4).
  100. ^ Bloom, Harold. Hamlet: Poem Unlimited. "There is a recent 'Be kind to Gertrude' fashion among some feminist critics..."
  101. ^ Showalter (1985).
  102. ^ Bloom (2003, 57).
  103. ^ MacCary (1998, 111–113).
  104. ^ Hamlet has 208 quotations in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations; it takes up 10 of 85 pages dedicated to Shakespeare in the 1986 Bartlett's Familiar Quotations (14th ed. 1968). For examples of lists of the greatest books, see Harvard Classics, Great Books, Great Books of the Western World, Harold Bloom's The Western Canon, St. John's College reading list, and Columbia College Core Curriculum.
  105. ^ Osborne (2007, 114–133 especially 115 and 120).
  106. ^ a b c d e Thompson and Taylor (2006a, 123–126).
  107. ^ Welsh (2001, 131).
  108. ^ a b Thompson and Taylor (2006a, 126–131).
  109. ^ Novy (1994, 62, 77–78).
  110. ^ Hamlet 3.1.55–87.
  111. ^ Writing in La Jeune Belgique in 1890; quoted by Braun (1982, 40).
  112. ^ Taylor (2002, 13).
  113. ^ Thompson and Taylor (2006a; 53–55); Chambers (1930, vol. 1, 334), cited by Dawson (2002, 176).
  114. ^ Dawson (2002, 176).
  115. ^ Pitcher and Woudhuysen (1969, 204).
  116. ^ Hibbard (1987, 17).
  117. ^ Marsden (2002, 21).
  118. ^ Holland (2007, 34).
  119. ^ Marsden (2002, 21–22).
  120. ^ Samuel Pepys records his delight at the novelty of Hamlet "done with scenes"; see Thompson and Taylor (1996, 57).
  121. ^ Taylor (1989, 16).
  122. ^ Thompson and Taylor (2006a, 98–99).
  123. ^ Letter to Sir William Young, 10 January 1773, quoted by Uglow (1977, 473).
  124. ^ Morrison (2002, 231).
  125. ^ Moody (2002, 41).
  126. ^ Moody (2002, 44), quoting Sheridan.
  127. ^ Gay (2002, 159).
  128. ^ Dawson (2002, 185–187).
  129. ^ Morrison (2002, 232–233).
  130. ^ Morrison (2002, 235–237).
  131. ^ William Winter, New York Tribune 26 October 1875, quoted by Morrison (2002, 241).
  132. ^ Morrison (2002, 241).
  133. ^ Schoch (2002, 58–75).
  134. ^ George Bernard Shaw in The Saturday Review 2 October 1897, quoted in Shaw (1961, 81).
  135. ^ Moody (2002, 54).
  136. ^ Halliday (1964, 204) and O'Connor (2002, 77).
  137. ^ Sarah Bernhardt, in a letter to the London Daily Telegraph, quoted by Gay (2002, 164).
  138. ^ Holland (2002, 203–205).
  139. ^ Dawson (2002, 184).
  140. ^ Dawson (2002, 188).
  141. ^ a b c Gillies et al. (2002, 259–262).
  142. ^ Dawson (2002, 180).
  143. ^ For more on this production, see the MAT production of Hamlet article. Craig and Stanislavski began planning the production in 1908 but, due to a serious illness of Stanislavski's, it was delayed until December, 1911. See Benedetti (1998, 188–211).
  144. ^ Benedetti (1999, 189, 195).
  145. ^ On Craig's relationship to Symbolism, Russian symbolism, and its principles of monodrama in particular, see Taxidou (1998, 38–41); on Craig's staging proposals, see Innes (1983, 153); on the centrality of the protagonist and his mirroring of the 'authorial self', see Taxidou (1998, 181, 188) and Innes (1983, 153).
  146. ^ The First Court Scene: Hamlet 1.2.1–128. A brightly lit, golden pyramid descended from Claudius's throne, representing the feudal hierarchy, giving the illusion of a single, unified mass of bodies. In the dark, shadowy foreground, separated by a gauze, Hamlet lay, as if dreaming. On Claudius's exit-line the figures remained but the gauze was loosened, so that they appeared to melt away as if Hamlet's thoughts had turned elsewhere. For this effect, the scene received an ovation, which was unheard of at the MAT. See Innes (1983, 152).
  147. ^ See Innes (1983, 140–175; esp. 165–167 on the use of the screens).
  148. ^ Innes (1983, 172).
  149. ^ Hortmann (2002, 214).
  150. ^ Hortmann (2002, 223).
  151. ^ Burian (1993), quoted by Hortmann (2002, 224–225).
  152. ^ a b c Gillies et al. (2002, 267–269).
  153. ^ Morrison (2002, 247–248); Thompson and Taylor (2006a, 109).
  154. ^ Morrison (2002, 249).
  155. ^ Morrison (2002, 249–250).
  156. ^ "A Pictorial History of the American Stage" by Daniel Blum, Crown Publishers, Inc. 1981, pp.307
  157. ^ "Olivier" by Robert Tanitch, Abbeville Press, 1985
  158. ^ Smallwood (2002, 108); National Theatre reviews Retrieved: 4 December 2007.
  159. ^ Vincent Canby, "Theatre Review: Ralph Fiennes as Mod Hamlet," The New York Times 3 May 1995.
  160. ^ Ari Panagako, "Dandy Hamlet Bows Uptown", Heights/Inwood Press of North Manhattan, 14 June 1978.
  161. ^ According to the Internet Broadway Database "show".  Romeo and Juliet is the second most-produced Shakespeare play on Broadway, with thirty-four different productions, followed by Twelfth Night, with thirty.
  162. ^ Ian McKellen, Alan Bates, Hugh Hudson, et al. For Ian Charleson: A Tribute. London: Constable and Company, 1990. p. 124.
  163. ^ Barratt, Mark. Ian McKellen: An Unofficial Biography. Virgin Books, 2005. p. 63.
  164. ^ "The Readiness Was All: Ian Charleson and Richard Eyre's Hamlet," by Richard Allan Davison. In Shakespeare: Text and Theater, Lois Potter and Arthur F. Kinney, eds. Newark: University of Delaware Press, 1999. pp. 170–182
  165. ^ Billington, Michael (6 August 2008). "From Time Lord to antic prince: David Tennant is the best Hamlet in years". The Guardian (London). 
  166. ^ Billington, Michael (4 May 2001). "Theatre: Hamlet". The Guardian (London). 
  167. ^ Gardner, Lyn (8 November 2002). "Hamlet, West Yorkshire Playhouse, Leeds". The Guardian (London). 
  168. ^ John B. Barrois/New Orleans Shakespeare Festival (2012-06-28). "Summer action hero? Tulane Shakespeare Fest opens with a Hamlet out for revenge". NOLA.com. Retrieved 2013-09-14. 
  169. ^ Mark Shenton, "Jude Law to Star in Donmar's Hamlet." The Stage. 10 September 2007. Retrieved 19 November 2007.
  170. ^ "Cook, Eyre, Lee And More Join Jude Law In Grandage's HAMLET." broadwayworld.com. 4 February 2009. Retrieved 18 February 2009.
  171. ^ "Jude Law to play Hamlet at 'home' Kronborg Castle." The Daily Mirror. 10 July 2009. Retrieved 14 July 2009.
  172. ^ "Shakespeare's Hamlet with Jude Law". Charlie Rose Show. video 53:55, 2 October 2009. Retrieved 6 October 2009.
  173. ^ Dave Itzkoff, "Donmar Warehouse's 'Hamlet' Coming to Broadway With Jude Law." New York Times. 30 June 2009. Retrieved 10 September 2009.
  174. ^ "Marshall Fine: Onstage: Paul Giamatti in Hamlet". Huffingtonpost.com. 2013-04-10. Retrieved 2015-07-11. 
  175. ^ "Globe to Globe Hamlet". Retrieved 23 June 2014. 
  176. ^ Cumberbatch's Hamlet most in-demand show of all time - Telegraph
  177. ^ Benedict Cumberbatch as 'Hamlet' Opens Next Year, And Is Now Sold Out - Speakeasy - WSJ
  178. ^ Hamlet Starring Benedict Cumberbatch: Official Site
  179. ^ The Fencing Scene: Hamlet 5.2.203–387.
  180. ^ a b c Brode (2001, 117–118).
  181. ^ Davies (2000, 171).
  182. ^ Fox, Margalit (2009-09-20). "Jack Manning obituary". New York Times. Retrieved 2013-09-14. 
  183. ^ "Innokenti Smoktunovsky – Biography – Movies & TV". Movies.nytimes.com. Retrieved 29 May 2010. 
  184. ^ Guntner (2000, 120–121).
  185. ^ Brode (2001, 125–127).
  186. ^ From Cartmell (2000, 212), Zeffirelli says he is trying to make Shakespeare "even more popular" in an interview quoted here given to The South Bank Show in December 1997.
  187. ^ Guntner (2000, 121–122).
  188. ^ Crowl (2000, 232).
  189. ^ Starks (1999, 272).
  190. ^ Keyishian (2000, 78–79).
  191. ^ Burnett (2000).
  192. ^ Hamlet Great Performances, PBS
  193. ^ Warren, Jim. "Director's Notes". American Shakespeare Center. Retrieved 20 June 2009. 
  194. ^ Gussow, Mel (14 October 1992). "Theater in Review". New York Times. Retrieved 26 June 2011. 
  195. ^ David G. Schultz (July 2008). "A Play at Poolside: Caridad Svich's 12 Ophelias". The Brooklyn Rail. Retrieved 26 June 2011. 
  196. ^ Quoted in promotional material of "The Magdalena Project:international network of women in contemporary theatre" at [1]
  197. ^ Grode, Eric (30 March 2011). "Theater in Review". New York Times. Retrieved 10 December 2011. 
  198. ^ "Wittenberg". Nytheatre.com. 2011-03-19. Retrieved 2013-09-14. 

Editions of Hamlet

  • Bate, Jonathan, and Eric Rasmussen, eds. 2007. Complete Works. By William Shakespeare. The RSC Shakespeare. New York: Modern Library. ISBN 0-679-64295-1.
  • Edwards, Phillip, ed. 1985. Hamlet, Prince of Denmark. New Cambridge Shakespeare ser. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-29366-9.
  • Hibbard, G. R., ed. 1987. Hamlet. Oxford World's Classics ser. Oxford. ISBN 0-19-283416-9.
  • Hoy, Cyrus, ed. 1992. Hamlet. Norton Critical Edition ser. 2nd ed. New York: Norton. ISBN 978-0-393-95663-4.
  • Irace, Kathleen O. 1998. The First Quarto of Hamlet. New Cambridge Shakespeare ser. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-65390-8.
  • Jenkins, Harold, ed. 1982. Hamlet. The Arden Shakespeare, second ser. London: Methuen. ISBN 1-903436-67-2.
  • Lott, Bernard, ed. 1970. Hamlet. New Swan Shakespeare Advanced ser. New ed. London: Longman. ISBN 0-582-52742-2.
  • Spencer, T. J. B., ed. 1980 Hamlet. New Penguin Shakespeare ser. London: Penguin. ISBN 0-14-070734-4.
  • Thompson, Ann and Neil Taylor, eds. 2006a. Hamlet. The Arden Shakespeare, third ser. Volume one. London: Arden. ISBN 1-904271-33-2.
  • ———. 2006b. Hamlet: The Texts of 1603 and 1623. The Arden Shakespeare, third ser. Volume two. London: Arden. ISBN 1-904271-80-4.
  • Wells, Stanley, and Gary Taylor, eds. 1988. The Complete Works. By William Shakespeare. The Oxford Shakespeare. Compact ed. Oxford: Clarendon Press; New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-871190-5.

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