Great Expectations


Publications in Harper's Weekly were accompanied by forty illustrations by John McLenan;[42] however, this is the only Dickens work published in All the Year Round without illustrations. In 1862, Marcus Stone,[43] son of Dickens's old friend, the painter Frank Stone, was invited to create eight woodcuts for the Library Edition. According to Paul Schlicke, these illustrations are mediocre yet were included in the Charles Dickens edition, and Stone created illustrations for Dickens's subsequent novel, Our Mutual Friend.[32] Later, Henry Mathew Brock also illustrated Great Expectations and a 1935 edition of A Christmas Carol,[44] along with other artists, such as John McLenan,[45] F. A. Fraser,[46] and Harry Furniss.[47]

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