Gone With the Wind

References

  1. ^ a b About the Author
  2. ^ a b "People on the Home Front: Margaret Mitchell", Sgt. H. N. Oliphant (October 19, 1945) Yank, p. 9. Retrieved May 12, 2011.
  3. ^ Obituary: Miss Mitchell, 49, Dead of Injuries (August 17, 1949) New York Times. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  4. ^ a b "The Making of Gone With the Wind", Gavin Lambert (February 1973) Atlantic Monthly. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  5. ^ a b Joseph M. Flora, Lucinda H. MacKethan, Todd Taylor (2002), The Companion to Southern Literature: themes, genres, places, people, movements and motifs, Louisiana State University Press, p. 308. ISBN 0-8071-2692-6
  6. ^ Jenny Bond and Chris Sheedy (2008), Who the Hell is Pansy O'Hara?: The Fascinating Stories Behind 50 of the World's Best-Loved Books, Penguin Books, p. 96. ISBN 978-0-14-311364-5
  7. ^ Ernest Dowson (1867–1900), Non Sum Qualis Eram Bonae sub Regno Cynarae. Retrieved March 31, 2012
  8. ^ a b c Part 3, Chapter 24
  9. ^ John Hollander, (1981) The Figure of Echo: a mode of allusion in Milton and after, University of California Press, p. 107. ISBN 978-0-520-05323-6
  10. ^ William Flesch, (2010) The Facts on File Companion to British Poetry, 19th century, Infobase Publishing, p. 89. ISBN 978-0-8160-5896-9
  11. ^ Poem of the week: Non sum qualis eram bonae sub regno Cynarae by Ernest Dowson Carol Rumen (March 14, 2011) The Guardian. Retrieved January 2, 2014.
  12. ^ Ellen F. Brown and John Wiley (2011), Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind: A Bestseller's Odyssey from Atlanta to Hollywood, Taylor Trade Publishing, p. 59 & 60. ISBN 978-1-58979-567-9
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Part 1, chapter 6
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i Part 1, chapter 1
  15. ^ a b c d e f g Part 1, chapter 7
  16. ^ a b c d e Part 2, chapter 9
  17. ^ "When this Cruel War is Over (Weeping, Sad and Lonely)", Charles C. Sawyer and Henry Tucker, published by J. C. Schreiner & Son, Savannah, Georgia, 1862. Stephen Collins Foster: Popular American Music Collection.
  18. ^ Weeping Sad and Lonely sung by Elizabeth Foster from the documentary "Civil War Songs and Stories", Copyright Nashville Public Television, 2011
  19. ^ a b c d Part 3, chapter 17
  20. ^ a b Part 3, chapter 22
  21. ^ a b c Part 3, chapter 26
  22. ^ a b Part 4, chapter 35
  23. ^ a b c Part 4, chapter 42
  24. ^ a b c d Part 4, chapter 47
  25. ^ a b c d Part 5, chapter 50
  26. ^ Part 5, chapter 53
  27. ^ a b c d Part 5, chapter 54
  28. ^ a b Part 5, chapter 56
  29. ^ a b c Part 5, chapter 57
  30. ^ Part 5, chapter 59
  31. ^ a b Part 5, chapter 63
  32. ^ a b Kathryn Lee Seidel (1985), The Southern Belle in the American Novel, University Presses of Florida, p. 53. ISBN 0-8130-0811-5
  33. ^ a b "A Critic at Large: A Study in Scarlett" Claudia Roth Pierpont, (August 31, 1992) The New Yorker, p. 87. Retrieved May 15, 2011.
  34. ^ Ken Gelder (2004), Popular Fiction: the logics and practices of a literary field, New York: Taylor & Francis e-Library, p. 49. ISBN 0-203-02336-6
  35. ^ Pamela Regis (2011), A Natural History of the Romance Novel, University of Pennsylvania Press, p. 48. ISBN 0-8122-1522-2
  36. ^ Deborah Lutz (2006), The Dangerous Lover: Villains, Byronism, and the nineteenth-century seduction narrative, The Ohio State University, p. 1 & 7. ISBN 978-0-8142-1034-5
  37. ^ James W. Elliott (1914), My Old Black Mammy, New York City: Published weekly by James W. Elliott, Inc. OCLC 823454
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  39. ^ Tim A. Ryan (2008), Calls and Responses: the American Novel of Slavery since Gone With the Wind, Louisiana State University Press, p. 69. ISBN 978-0-8071-3322-4.
  40. ^ Ryan, T. A., Calls and Responses: the American Novel of Slavery since Gone With the Wind, p. 22-23.
  41. ^ a b c d e f g h Part 4, chapter 37
  42. ^ a b c Part 4, chapter 38
  43. ^ Ryan, T. A., Calls and Responses: the American Novel of Slavery since Gone With the Wind, p. 23.
  44. ^ James Stirling (1857), Letters From the Slave States, London: John W. Parker and Son, West Strand, p. 287. OCLC 3177567
  45. ^ William Wells Brown (1847), Narrative of William W. Brown, Fugitive Slave, Boston: Published at the Anti-Slavery Office, No. 25 Cornhill, p. 15. OCLC 12705739
  46. ^ Kimberly Wallace-Sanders (2008), Mammy: a century of race and Southern memory, University of Michigan Press, p. 130. ISBN 978-0-472-11614-0
  47. ^ "The Old Black Mammy", (January 1918) Confederate Veteran. Retrieved April 24, 2011.
  48. ^ "Love's Old, Sweet Song", J.L. Molloy and G. Clifton Bingham, 1884. Retrieved April 27, 2011.
  49. ^ Micki McElya (2007), Clinging to Mammy: the faithful slave in twentieth-century America, Harvard University Press, p. 3. ISBN 978-0-674-02433-5
  50. ^ Flora, J.M., et al., The Companion to Southern Literature: themes, genres, places, people, movements and motifs, pp. 140–144.
  51. ^ Carolyn Perry and Mary Louise Weaks (2002), The History of Southern Women's Literature, Louisiana State University Press, p. 261. ISBN 0-8071-2753-1
  52. ^ a b c d e f g h Part 1, chapter 3
  53. ^ Seidel, K.L., The Southern Belle in the American Novel, p. 53-54
  54. ^ Pierpont, C.R.," A Critic at Large: A Study in Scarlett", p. 92.
  55. ^ Seidel, K.L., The Southern Belle in the American Novel, p. 54.
  56. ^ Perry, C., et al., The History of Southern Women's Literature, pp. 259, 261.
  57. ^ Betina Entzminger (2002), The Belle Gone Bad: White Southern women writers and the dark seductress, Louisiana State University Press, p. 106. ISBN 0-8071-2785-X
  58. ^ Why we love -- and hate -- 'Gone with the Wind'. Todd Leopold (December 31, 2014) CNN. Retrieved February 26, 2015.
  59. ^ Giselle Roberts (2003), The Confederate Belle, University of Missouri Press, p.87-88. ISBN 0-8262-1464-9
  60. ^ Laura F. Edwards (2000), Scarlett Doesn't Live Here Anymore: Southern women and the Civil War era, University of Illinois Press, p. 3. ISBN 0-252-02568-7
  61. ^ Jennifer W. Dickey (2014), A Tough Little Patch of History: Gone with the Wind and the politics of memory, University of Arkansas Press, p. 66. ISBN 978-1-55728-657-4
  62. ^ Ada W. Bacot and Jean V. Berlin (1994), A Confederate Nurse: the diary of Ada W. Bacot, 1860–1863, University of South Carolina Press, pp. ix–x, 1, 4. ISBN 1-57003-386-2
  63. ^ Kate Cumming and Richard Barksdale Harwell (1959), Kate: the journal of a Confederate nurse, Louisiana State University Press, p. xiii. ISBN 978-0-8071-2267-9
  64. ^ Cumming, K., et al., Kate: the journal of a Confederate nurse, p. 15.
  65. ^ a b c d e f g h Part 2, chapter 14
  66. ^ Part 2, chapter 15
  67. ^ a b c Part 2, chapter 16
  68. ^ Henry Marvin Wharton (1904), War Songs and Poems of the Southern Confederacy, 1861-1865, Philadelphia: The John C. Winston Co., p. 188. OCLC 9348166
  69. ^ a b Daniel E. Sutherland (1988), The Confederate Carpetbaggers, Louisiana State University Press, p. 4. ISBN 0-8071-1393-X
  70. ^ a b Elizabeth Young, (1999) Disarming the Nation: women's writing and the American Civil War, University of Chicago Press, p. 254. ISBN 0-226-96087-0
  71. ^ a b c d e f g h Part 4, chapter 41
  72. ^ a b Part 2, chapter 11
  73. ^ a b Young, E., Disarming the Nation: women's writing and the American Civil War, p. 252
  74. ^ William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Act 5, Scene 1: The poet’s eye, in fine frenzy rolling, Doth glance from heaven to Earth, from Earth to heaven.
  75. ^ Anne Goodwyn Jones (1981), Tomorrow is Another Day: The woman writer in the South 1859–1936, Baton Rouge: University of Louisiana Press, p. 354-355. ISBN 0-8071-0776-X
  76. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Part 1, chapter 2
  77. ^ a b Young, E., Disarming the Nation: women's writing and the American Civil War, p. 253.
  78. ^ Jones, A. G., Tomorrow is Another Day: the woman writer in the South 1859–1936, p. 355.
  79. ^ Darden Asbury Pyron (1991), Southern Daughter: the life of Margaret Mitchell, New York: Oxford University Press, p. 320. ISBN 978-0-19-505276-3
  80. ^ Craig Thompson Friend, (2009) Southern Masculinity: persepectives on manhood in the South since Reconstruction, University of Georgia Press, p. xviii. ISBN 978-0-8203-3674-9
  81. ^ Part 4, chapter 33
  82. ^ Lutz, D., The Dangerous Lover: villains, byronism, and the nineteenth-century seduction narrative, p. 84.
  83. ^ John S. Farmer (1889), Farmer's Dictionary of Americanisms, Thomas Poulter & Sons, p. 473. OCLC 702331118
  84. ^ Leslie Dunkling (1990), A Dictionary of Epithets and Terms of Address, London; New York: Routledge, p. 216. ISBN 0-415-00761-5
  85. ^ Part 4, chapter 31
  86. ^ Part 4, chapters 37 & 46
  87. ^ a b c Part 2, chapter 13
  88. ^ a b c Numan V. Bartley (1988), The Evolution of Southern Culture, University of Georgia Press, p. 99. ISBN 0-8203-0993-1
  89. ^ Margaret Mitchell and Patrick Allen (2000), Margaret Mitchell: Reporter, Athens: Hill Street Press, p. 152-154. ISBN 978-1-57003-937-9
  90. ^ Young, E., Disarming the Nation: women's writing and the American Civil War, p. 259.
  91. ^ a b c d Part 5, chapter 62
  92. ^ Young, E., Disarming the Nation: women's writing and the American Civil War, p. 260 & 262.
  93. ^ a b c Entzminger, B., The Belle Gone Bad: white Southern women writers and the dark seductress, p. 109.
  94. ^ Young, E., Disarming the Nation: Women's writing and the American Civil War, p. 238.
  95. ^ a b Bartley, N. V., The Evolution of Southern Culture, p. 100.
  96. ^ Young, E., Disarming the Nation: women's writing and the American Civil War, p. 237.
  97. ^ Steven G. Kellman and Irving Malin (1999), Leslie Fiedler and the American Culture, Associated University Presses, Inc., p. 134. ISBN 0-87413-689-X
  98. ^ Word for Word.A Scholarly Debate; Rhett and Scarlett: Rough Sex Or Rape? Feminists Give a Damn Tom Kuntz (February 19, 1995) The New York Times. Retrieved June 17, 2012.
  99. ^ Lutz, D., The Dangerous Lover: Willains, byronism, and the nineteenth-century seduction narrative, p. 7-8.
  100. ^ a b Celia R. Daileader (2005), Racism, Misogyny, and the Othello Myth: inter-racial couples from Shakespeare to Spike Lee, Cambridge University Presses, p. 168-169. ISBN 978-0-521-84878-7
  101. ^ a b c d Part 3, chapter 19
  102. ^ a b Part 5, chapter 61
  103. ^ "The Strange Story Behind Gone With the Wind", Actor Cordell, Jr. (February 1961) Coronet, p. 106. Retrieved April 24, 2011.
  104. ^ a b c Part 4, chapter 39
  105. ^ Part 3, chapter 25
  106. ^ a b c Part 3, chapter 30
  107. ^ a b Part 4, chapter 36
  108. ^ a b Part 4, chapter 46
  109. ^ a b c d e f Part 1, chapter 5
  110. ^ a b c d Part 1, chapter 4
  111. ^ Part 4, chapter 44
  112. ^ a b c Part 3, chapter 29
  113. ^ Part 2, chapter 10
  114. ^ Part 4, chapter 32
  115. ^ a b c d e f g Part 2, chapter 8
  116. ^ Part 3, chapter 23
  117. ^ a b Part 3, chapter 21
  118. ^ Part 3, chapter 18
  119. ^ a b "Color Symbolism and Mythology in Margaret Mitchell's Novel Gone with the Wind", O. Levitski and O. Dumer (September 2006) Magazine Americana. Retrieved December 8, 2013.
  120. ^ David O'Connell (1996), The Irish Roots of Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind, Decatur: Claves & Petry Ltd, p. 58 & 63. ISBN 978-0965309301
  121. ^ Bryan Albin Giemza (2013), Rethinking the Irish in the American South: beyond rounders and reelers, University Press of Mississippi, p. 85. ISBN 978-1-61703-798-6
  122. ^ Pyron, D. A., Southern Daughter: the life of Margaret Mitchell, p. 366.
  123. ^ Young, E., Disarming the Nation: women's writing and the American Civil War, p. 268 & 272.
  124. ^ Catherine Clinton (1994), Half Sisters of History: Southern women and the American past, Duke University Press, p. 176. ISBN 978-0822314967
  125. ^ Helen Taylor (1989), Scarlett's Women: Gone with the Wind and its female fans, Rutgers University Press, p. 79. ISBN 0-8135-1496-7
  126. ^ Pierpont, C.R., A Critic at Large: A Study in Scarlett, p. 88.
  127. ^ "Books of the Times: Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell", Ralph Thompson, (June 30, 1936) New York Times. Retrieved May 13, 2011.
  128. ^ Brown, E., et al., Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind: A Bestseller's Odyssey from Atlanta to Hollywood, Taylor Trade Publishing, p. 44 & 167.
  129. ^ a b James Loewen "Debunking History" transcript from May 12, 2000. Retrieved April 2, 2011.
  130. ^ Jabari Asim (2007), The N Word: who can say it, who shouldn't, and why, New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, p. 150. ISBN 978-0-618-19717-0
  131. ^ Pat Conroy, Preface to Gone With the Wind, Pocket Books edition
  132. ^ Albert E. Castel (2010), Winning and Losing in the Civil War: essays and stories, University of South Carolina Press, p. 87. ISBN 978-1-57003-917-1
  133. ^ Patricia Yaeger (2000), Dirt and Desire: reconstructing southern women's writing, 1930–1990, University of Chicago Press, p. 102. ISBN 0-226-94490-5
  134. ^ O'Connell, D., The Irish Roots of Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind, p. 14-15 & 71.
  135. ^ Part 5, chapter 49
  136. ^ Giemza, B. A., Rethinking the Irish in the American South: beyond rounders and reelers, p. 80-81 & 83.
  137. ^ Marianne Walker (1993), Margaret Mitchell and John Marsh: the love story behind Gone With the Wind, Atlanta: Peachtree Publishers, p. vii (preface to 2011 edition). ISBN 978-1-56145-617-8
  138. ^ Dawn B. Sova (2006), Banned Books: Literature Suppressed on Social Grounds, New York: Infobase Publishing, p. 166. ISBN 0-8160-6271-4
  139. ^ 5 Honors Awarded on the Year's Books: ..., The New York Times, Feb 26, 1937, page 23. ProQuest Historical Newspapers The New York Times (1851–2007)
  140. ^ The Bible is America's Favorite Book Followed by Gone With the Wind, (April 8, 2008) Business Wire. Retrieved May 10, 2011.
  141. ^ The Bible Remains America's Favorite Book Retrieved April 29, 2014.
  142. ^ a b Brown, Ellen F., et al., Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind: A Bestseller's Odyssey from Atlanta to Hollywood, p. 320.
  143. ^ Full List-ALL TIME 100 Novels, Lev Grossman and Richard Lacayo, (October 16, 2005) TIME. Retrieved May 10, 2011.
  144. ^ TIME'S List of the 100 Best Novels, James Kelly, (October 16, 2005) TIME. Retrieved May 10, 2011
  145. ^ "BBC - The Big Read". BBC. April 2003, Retrieved October 27, 2012
  146. ^ Gone with the Wind (1939)at IMDb. Retrieved February 11, 2013.
  147. ^ Brown, E. F., et al., Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind: A Bestseller's Odyssey from Atlanta to Hollywood, p. 292-293.
  148. ^ Gone with the Wind (Moon 1977) Retrieved February 3, 2014.
  149. ^ Gone with the Wind (Moon 2014) Retrieved February 3, 2014.
  150. ^ fr:Autant en emporte le vent (comédie musicale)
  151. ^ Gone With The Wind, New London Theatre, London, Michael Billingon, (April 22, 2008)The Guardian. Retrieved February 11, 2013.
  152. ^ Gone With the Wind Dvorak, A. / Pártay L. Retrieved November 6, 2012
  153. ^ "Gone With the Wind" is frankly worth giving a damn about. Retrieved March 9, 2013.
  154. ^ Walker, M.,, Margaret Mitchell and John Marsh: the love story behind Gone With the Wind, p. 454.
  155. ^ I Love Lucy-Lucy Writes a Novel. Retrieved February 11, 2013
  156. ^ Marylou Morano Kjelle (2008), S. E. Hinton: Author of The Outsiders, Lake Book Mfg, p. 28. ISBN 978-0-7660-2720-6
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  158. ^ "Carol Burnett—We Just Can’t Resist Her!". May 14, 2009. Retrieved August 19, 2011. 
  159. ^ "Groan With the Wind", Jack Davis and Stan Hart (January 1991), Mad #300.
  160. ^ Young, E., Disarming the Nation: women's writing and the American Civil War, p. 281
  161. ^ MADtv (season 12)
  162. ^ Gone With the Wind (Alternate Endings). Retrieved September 19, 2012.
  163. ^ a b Gone With the Wind Stamps
  164. ^ Margaret Mitchell and Pat Conroy (1936), Gone With the Wind, 75th Anniversary Edition (2011 paperback), New York: Scribner. ISBN 978-1-4516-3562-1
  165. ^ Frankly, My Dear, the ‘Windies’ Do Live for This Kim Severson, (April 13, 2011) The New York Times. Retrieved May 2, 2013.
  166. ^ Joel Williamson (1993), William Faulkner and Southern History, Oxford University Press, p. 245. ISBN 0-19-507404-1
  167. ^ Flora, J.M., et al., The Companion to Southern Literature: themes, genres, places, people, movements and motifs, p. 143.
  168. ^ Dickey, J. W., A Tough Little Patch of History: Gone with the Wind and the politics of memory, p. 40.
  169. ^ Books That Shaped America Retrieved July 5, 2012.
  170. ^ Perry, C., et al., The History of Southern Women's Literature, p. 266-267.
  171. ^ Reading Gone With the Wind in Pyongyang, Tim Sullivan, (October 25, 2012) TIME magazine. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  172. ^ Gone With the Wind' still blowing them away 75 years on, Chris Melzer, (July 4, 2011) The China Post. Retrieved August 19, 2012.
  173. ^ Brown, E. F., et al., Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind: A Bestseller's Odyssey from Atlanta to Hollywood, p. 278.
  174. ^ "Margaret Mitchell's Nephew Leaves Estate to Atlanta Archdiocese", Shelia M. Poole, (August 16, 2012) The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved August 17, 2012.
  175. ^ Brown, E. F., et al., Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind: A Bestseller's Odyssey from Atlanta to Hollywood, p. 271-272.
  176. ^ A Piece of ‘Gone With the Wind’ Isn’t Gone After All Charles McGrath, (March 29, 2011) The New York Times. Retrieved October 29, 2012.
  177. ^ Brown, E. F., et al., Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind: A Bestseller's Odyssey from Atlanta to Hollywood, p. 61, 75, 81-82 & 91.
  178. ^ Copyright page, 1946 copy
  179. ^ a b on 1937 copyright page
  180. ^ Alexandra Ripley (1994), Scarlett, Pan Books. ISBN 978-0-330-30752-9
  181. ^ IMDb Scarlett (TV mini-series 1994)
  182. ^ Donald McCaig (2007), Rhett Butler's People, Macmillan. ISBN 978-0-312-94578-7/
  183. ^ Mammy Revealed, and Not Just Her Red Petticoat ‘Gone With the Wind’ Prequel Coming in October Julie Bosman (March 26, 2014) The New York Times. Retrieved March 26, 2014.
  184. ^ Alice Randall (2001), The Wind Done Gone, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. ISBN 978-0-618-10450-5.
  185. ^ Katherine Pinotti (2008), The Winds of Tara, Fontaine Press. ISBN 978-0-9803623-5-0
  186. ^ "Frankly My Dear, Russians Do Give a Damn", Alessandra Stanley, (August 29, 1994) The New York Times. Retrieved June 10, 2011.
  187. ^ |Sequels of famous novels

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