Galileo Themes

Galileo Themes

The truth vs. fear

The truth could be a dangerous weapon, an instrument for changing the world, or a completely useless thing. Galileo believes that everyone wants to know the truth as much as he does, but it is not like that. The truth he wants other people to see and accept threats a traditional way of life. A strong fear makes people close their eyes and stay mute to the truth. If other scientists were less afraid of the Inquisition and its bonfires, they would definitely have changed the world sooner. However, no one has a right to blame them, for Galileo himself prefers to recant. A place, where fears dwell doesn’t suit the truth

Loyalty

This story is not only about loyalty to certain ideas, but human loyalty to others. Andrea’s worshiping of Galileo is both touching and confusing at the same time. He has been always helping him, serving him as a servant and as an apprentice. Due to the fact that Andrea spends almost all his life near Galileo and follows him as a shadow, he gets used to the man and starts worshiping him, paying no attention to his faults. Although, his loyalty is long-lasting and endurable, it is also blind

The Church

The Church is a complex organization. For many years, it has been influencing policy and lives of ordinary people. Although the Church has done a lot of good, its history is rather controversial. Here a reader sees, how the Inquisition, using the name of God as an excuse for tortures and murdering, tries to keep power in its hands. That Church was more removed from God than any of those heretics convicted by the priests. It is a reminder why any religious group shouldn’t spread hate and fear.

Parents and children

This theme is also not omitted in the play. Galileo has a daughter, whose life depends on her father’s actions. His young helper has a mother, Mrs. Sarti , who also works for Galileo, although her primarily concern is her son’s welfare. A reader sees an example of two different parents, who love their children in a different way. When Mrs. Sarti values her son more than anything, Galileo loves truth more than his daughter. However, that was one of the historical inaccuracies which the author allowed himself to make. Unlike the Galileo and Virginia depicted in the play, the actual father and daughter were close

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