Frankenstein

three decisions Frankenstein and his monster make throughout the novel

Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein and the multiple versions of the film all raise interesting questions about the use and misuse of technology.consider three decisions Frankenstein and his monster make throughout the novel. What is Shelley’s vision of the future?

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Okay, let’s start with Victor. There isn't anything inherently bad with having an interest in alchemy but when he starts assembling pieces of dead people, things get a bit creepy. Victor's first mistake is one of the themes in this story. Viktor should have considered the ramifications of assembling parts of dead people in case he actually brought one to life. It's that whole God/ creator/ responsibility dilemma. Thankfully this is not a common occurrence but Victor was not ready for the fallout.

I think the monster bears some responsibility as well. People don't take to him that well. Looking like a bunch of dead body parts can't be easy. He also feels abandoned by his father/creator. So, in his rage, the monster kills William (Victor’s younger brother). That was mean! Then the monster kills the woman Victor is planning on marrying. I'm sure revenge has its place but the taking of innocent lives only complicates matters for everyone involved.

Victor promised the monster that he would make him a female companion. Did he not learn from the first time he did this? I understand he felt sorry for the monster and a promise is a promise. Victor doesn't follow through which further angers the monster.

I think, in the end, Shelly is commenting on human inability to play God in any way, shape or form. Human beings are flawed and fallible; we cannot handle the power of creation in this form. Shelly asked us to examine our own natural creations (babies) and ask some of the same questions. Science fiction writers like Philip K Dick, who wrote "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep aka "Blade Runner" were inspired by the themes in Frankenstein as well.