Fahrenheit 451

References

  1. ^ a b Crider, Bill (Fall 1980). Laughlin, Charlotte; Lee, Billy C., eds. "Ray Bradbury's FAHRENHEIT 451". Paperback Quarterly III (3): 22. ISBN 978-1-4344-0633-0. The first paperback edition featured illustrations by Joe Mugnaini and contained two stories in addition to the title tale: 'The Playground' and 'And The Rock Cried Out.' 
  2. ^ a b Gerall, Alina; Hobby, Blake (2010). "Fahrenheit 451". In Bloom, Harold; Hobby, Blake. Civil Disobedience. Infobase Publishing. p. 148. ISBN 978-1-60413-439-1. While Fahrenheit 451 begins as a dystopic novel about a totalitarian government that bans reading, the novel ends with Montag relishing the book he has put to memory. 
  3. ^ Reid, Robin Anne (2000). Ray Bradbury: A Critical Companion. Critical Companions to Popular Contemporary Writers. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. p. 53. ISBN 0-313-30901-9. Fahrenheit 451 is considered one of Bradbury's best works. 
  4. ^ Seed, David. A Companion to Science Fiction. Blackwell Companions to Literature and Culture 34. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publications. pp. 491–498. ISBN 978-1-4051-1218-5. 
  5. ^ Rogers, John (June 6, 2012). "Author of 'Fahrenheit 451,' Ray Bradbury, Dies at 91". AP. U.S. News and World Report. Retrieved August 3, 2013. (451 degrees Fahrenheit, Bradbury had been told, was the temperature at which texts went up in flames) 
  6. ^ Reid, Robin Anne (2000). Ray Bradbury: A Critical Companion. Critical Companions to Popular Contemporary Writers. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. p. 53. ISBN 0-313-30901-9. ... the title refers to the temperature at which paper burns ... 
  7. ^ "Ticket to the Moon (tribute to SciFi)" (Ogg). Biography in Sound. Narrated by Norman Rose. NBC Radio News. December 4, 1956. 27:10–27:30. Retrieved March 1, 2013. I wrote this book at a time when I was worried about the way things were going in this country four years ago. Too many people were afraid of their shadows; there was a threat of book burning. Many of the books were being taken off the shelves at that time. 
  8. ^ a b Aggelis, Steven L., ed. (2004). Conversations with Ray Bradbury. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi. p. xxix. ISBN 1-57806-640-9. ...[in 1954 Bradbury received] two other awards—National Institute of Arts and Letters Award in Literature and Commonwealth Club of California Literature Gold Medal Award—for Fahrenheit 451, which is published in three installments in Playboy
  9. ^ Davis, Scott A. "The California Book Awards Winners 1931 - 2012" (PDF). Commonwealth Club of California. Retrieved 5 March 2014. 
  10. ^ Nolan, William F. (May 1963). "BRADBURY: Prose Poet In The Age Of Space". The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction (Mercury) 24 (5): 20. Then there was the afternoon at Huston's Irish manor when a telegram arrived to inform Bradbury that his first novel, Fahrenheit 451, a bitterly-satirical story of the book-burning future, had been awarded a grant of $1,000 from the National Institute of Arts and Letters. 
  11. ^ "Libertarian Futurist Society: Prometheus Awards, A Short History". Retrieved August 9, 2013. 
  12. ^ "1954 Retro Hugo Awards". Retrieved August 9, 2013. 
  13. ^ a b Nielsen Business Media, Inc (January 22, 1976). "19th Annual Grammy Awards Final Nominations". Billboard 89 (3): 110. ISSN 0006-2510. 
  14. ^ Genzlinger, Neil (March 25, 2006). "Godlight Theater's 'Fahrenheit 451' Offers Hot Ideas for the Information Age". The New York Times. Retrieved August 10, 2013. 
  15. ^ Reid, Robin Anne (2000). Ray Bradbury: A Critical Companion. Critical Companions to Popular Contemporary Writers. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. p. 53. ISBN 0-313-30901-9. Fahrenheit 451 is set in an unnamed city in the United States, possibly in the Midwest, in some undated future. 
  16. ^ Society for the Study of Midwestern Literature (2001). Greasley, Philip A., ed. Dictionary of Midwestern Literature. 1, The Authors. Indiana University Press. p. 78. ISBN 9780253336095. Retrieved 5 March 2014. Fahrenheit 451 is not set in any specific locale... 
  17. ^ de Koster, Katie, ed. (2000). Readings on Fahrenheit 451. Literary Companion Series. San Diego, CA: Greenhaven Press. p. 35. ISBN 1-56510-857-4. Montag does not realize at first that she is gone, or that he misses her; he simply feels that something is the matter. 
  18. ^ de Koster, Katie, ed. (2000). Readings on Fahrenheit 451. Literary Companion Series. San Diego, CA: Greenhaven Press. p. 32. ISBN 1-56510-857-4. The Mechanical Hound is an eight-legged glass and metal contraption that serves as a surveillance tool and programmable killing machine for the firemen, who use it to track down suspected book hoarders and readers. 
  19. ^ de Koster, Katie, ed. (2000). Readings on Fahrenheit 451. Literary Companion Series. San Diego, CA: Greenhaven Press. p. 31. ISBN 1-56510-857-4. Montag's new neighbor, the sixteen-year-old Clarisse, appears in only a few scenes at the beginning of the novel. 
  20. ^ Cusatis, John (2010). Research Guide to American Literature: Postwar Literature 1945–1970. Facts on File Library of American Literature 6 (New ed.). New York, NY: Infobase Publishing. ISBN 978-1-4381-3405-5. He 'wept' when he learned at the age of nine that the ancient library of Alexandria had been burned. 
  21. ^ Westfahl, Gary (2005). The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Science Fiction and Fantasy: Themes, Works, and Wonders 3. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 1029. ISBN 9780313329531. Inspired by images of book burning by the Nazis and written at the height of Army-McCarthy 'Red Scare' hearings in America, Fahrenheit 451... 
  22. ^ Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 audio guide. The Big Read. 08:57–09:44. Well, we should learn from history about the destruction of books. When I was fifteen years old, Hitler burned books in the streets of Berlin. And it terrified me because I was a librarian and he was touching my life: all those great plays, all that great poetry, all those wonderful essays, all those great philosophers. So, it became very personal, didn't it? Then I found out about Russia burning the books behind the scenes. But they did it in such a way that people didn't know about it. They killed the authors behind the scenes. They burned the authors instead of the books. So I learned then how dangerously [sic] it all was. 
  23. ^ Kelley, Ken (May 1996). "Playboy Interview: Ray Bradbury". Playboy. raybradbury.com. In the movie business the Hollywood Ten were sent to prison for refusing to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee, and in the Screen Writers Guild Bradbury was one of the lonely voices opposing the loyalty oath imposed on its members. 
  24. ^ Beley, Gene (2007). Ray Bradbury uncensored!. Lincoln, NE: iUniverse. ISBN 978-0-595-37364-2. 'I was angry at Senator Joseph McCarthy and the people before him, like Parnell Thomas and the House Un-American Activities Committee and Bobby Kennedy, who was part of that whole bunch,' Bradbury told Judith Green, San Joe Mercury News theatre critic, in the October 30, 1993, edition. 'I was angry about the blacklisting and the Hollywood 10. I was a $100 a week screenwriter, but I wasn't scared—I was angry.' 
  25. ^ Beley, Gene (2006). Ray Bradbury Uncensored!: The Unauthorized Biography. iUniverse. pp. 130–140. ISBN 9780595373642. 
  26. ^ Eller, Jonathan R.; Touponce, William F. (2004). Ray Bradbury: The Life of Fiction. Kent State University Press. pp. 164–165. ISBN 9780873387798. 
  27. ^ Hendershot, Cynthia (1999). Paranoia, the Bomb, and 1950s Science Fiction Films. Popular Press. p. 127. ISBN 9780879727994. Even if many 1950s sf films seem comic to us today, they register the immediacy of the nuclear threat for their original audiences. 
  28. ^ Reid, Robin Anne (2000). Ray Bradbury: A Critical Companion. Critical Companions to Popular Contemporary Writers. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. p. 59. ISBN 0-313-30901-9. 
  29. ^ Bradbury, Ray (2006). "Preface". In Albright, Donn; Eller, Jon. Match to Flame: The Fictional Paths to Fahrenheit 451 (1st ed.). Colorado Springs, CO: Gauntlet Publications. p. 9. ISBN 1-887368-86-8. For many years I've told people that Fahrenheit 451 was the result of my story 'The Pedestrian' continuing itself in my life. It turns out that this is a misunderstanding of my own past. Long before 'The Pedestrian' I did all the stories that you'll find in this book and forgot about them. 
  30. ^ The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction (Mercury) 24 (5): 23. May 1963. Ray Bradbury calls this story, the first of the tandem, 'a curiosity. I wrote it [he says] back in 1947–48 and it remained in my files over the years, going out only a few times to quality markets like Harper's Bazaar or The Atlantic Monthly, where it was dismissed. It lay in my files and collected about it many ideas. These ideas grew large and became ... FAHRENHEIT 451.‍ '​  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  31. ^ Bradbury, Ray (May 1963). "Bright Phoenix". The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction (Mercury) 24 (5): 23–29. 
  32. ^ "About the Book: Fahrenheit 451". The Big Read. National Endowment for the Arts. 
  33. ^ Eller, Jon (2006). Albright, Donn; Eller, Jon, eds. Writing by Degrees: The Family Tree of Fahrenheit 451. Match to Flame: The Fictional Paths to Fahrenheit 451 (1st ed.) (Colorado Springs, CO: Gauntlet Publications). p. 68. ISBN 1-887368-86-8. The specific incident that sparked 'The Pedestrian' involved a similar late-night walk with a friend along Wilshire Boulevard near Western Avenue sometime in late 1949. 
  34. ^ a b c Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 audio guide. The Big Read. 14:18–14:54. When I came out of a restaurant when I was thirty years old, and I went walking along Wilshire Boulevard with a friend, and a police car pulled up and the policeman got up and came up to us and said, 'What are you doing?'. I said, 'Putting one foot in front of the other' and that was the wrong answer but he kept saying, you know, 'Look in this direction and that direction: there are no pedestrians' but that give me the idea for the 'The Pedestrian' and 'The Pedestrian' turned into Montag! So the police officer is responsible for the writing of Fahrenheit 451
  35. ^ a b c de Koster, Katie, ed. (2000). Readings on Fahrenheit 451. Literary Companion Series. San Diego, CA: Greenhaven Press. p. 26. ISBN 1-56510-857-4. 
  36. ^ de Koster, Katie, ed. (2000). Readings on Fahrenheit 451. Literary Companion Series. San Diego, CA: Greenhaven Press. p. 158. ISBN 1-56510-857-4. He writes 'The Phoenix [sic],' which he will later develop into the short story 'The Fireman,' which will eventually become Fahrenheit 451
  37. ^ Eller, Jon (2006). Albright, Donn; Eller, Jon, eds. Writing by Degrees: The Family Tree of Fahrenheit 451. Match to Flame: The Fictional Paths to Fahrenheit 451 (1st ed.) (Colorado Springs, CO: Gauntlet Publications). p. 68. ISBN 1-887368-86-8. As Bradbury has often noted, 'The Pedestrian' marks the true flashpoint that exploded into 'The Fireman' and Fahrenheit 451
  38. ^ Bradbury, Ray (February 1951). "The Fireman". Galaxy Science Fiction. 5 15 (1): 4–61. 
  39. ^ de Koster, Katie, ed. (2000). Readings on Fahrenheit 451. Literary Companion Series. San Diego, CA: Greenhaven Press. p. 164. ISBN 1-56510-857-4. The short story which Bradbury later expanded into the novel Fahrenheit 451, was originally published in Galaxy Science Fiction, vol. 1, no. 5 (February 1951), under the title 'The Fireman.' 
  40. ^ a b Eller, Jon (2006). Albright, Donn; Eller, Jon, eds. Writing by Degrees: The Family Tree of Fahrenheit 451. Match to Flame: The Fictional Paths to Fahrenheit 451 (1st ed.) (Colorado Springs, CO: Gauntlet Publications). p. 57. ISBN 1-887368-86-8. In 1950 Ray Bradbury composed his 25,000-word novella 'The Fireman' in just this way, and three years later he returned to the same subterranean typing room for another nine-day stint to expand this cautionary tale into the 50,000-word novel Fahrenheit 451
  41. ^ Bradbury, Ray (2003). Fahrenheit 451 (50th anniversary ed.). New York, NY: Ballantine Books. pp. 167–168. ISBN 0-345-34296-8. 
  42. ^ Baxter, John (2005). A Pound of Paper: Confessions of a Book Addict. Macmillan. p. 393. ISBN 9781466839892. When it published the first edition in 1953, Ballantine also produced 200 signed and numbered copies bound in Johns-Manville Quintera, a form of asbestos. 
  43. ^ a b Brier, Evan (2011). A Novel Marketplace: Mass Culture, the Book Trade, and Postwar American Fiction. University of Pennsylvania Press. p. 65. ISBN 9780812201444. Bradbury closes his 1979 'Coda' to Fahrenheit 451, one of numerous comments on the novel he has published since 1953, ... 
  44. ^ Reid, Robin Anne (2000). Ray Bradbury: A Critical Companion. Critical Companions to Popular Contemporary Writers. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. p. 53. ISBN 0-313-30901-9. In a 1982 afterword... 
  45. ^ Tuck, Donald H. (March 1974). The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction and Fantasy. 1: Who's Who, A–L. Chicago, IL: Advent. p. 62. ISBN 0-911682-20-1. LCCN 73091828. Special edition bound in asbestos—200 copies ca. 1954, $4.00 [probably Ballantine text] 
  46. ^ "Fahrenheit 451". Ray Bradbury Online. spaceagecity.com. Retrieved September 4, 2013. 200 copies were signed and numbered and bound in 'Johns-Manville Quinterra,' an asbestos material. 
  47. ^ de Koster, Katie, ed. (2000). Readings on Fahrenheit 451. Literary Companion Series. San Diego, CA: Greenhaven Press. p. 164. ISBN 1-56510-857-4. A special limited-edition version of the book with an asbestos cover was printed in 1953. 
  48. ^ Weller, Sam (2006). The Bradbury Chronicles: The Life of Ray Bradbury. HarperCollins. p. 208. ISBN 978-0-06-054584-0. To fulfill his agreement with Doubleday that the book be a collection rather than a novel, the first edition of Fahrenheit 451 included two additional short stories—'The Playground' and 'And the Rock Cried Out.' (The original plan was to include eight stories plus Fahrenheit 451, but Ray didn't have time to revise all the tales.) 'The Playground' and 'And the Rock Cried Out' were removed in much later printings; in the meantime, Ray had met his contractual obligation with the first edition. Fahrenheit 451 was a short novel, but it was also a part of a collection. 
  49. ^ de Koster, Katie, ed. (2000). Readings on Fahrenheit 451. Literary Companion Series. San Diego, CA: Greenhaven Press. p. 159. ISBN 1-56510-857-4. A serialized version of Fahrenheit 451 appears in the March, April, and May 1954 issues of Playboy magazine. 
  50. ^ Crider, Bill (Fall 1980). Lee, Billy C.; Laughlin, Charlotte, eds. "Reprints/Reprints: Ray Bradbury's FAHRENHEIT 451". Paperback Quarterly III (3): 25. The censorship began with a special 'Bal-Hi' edition in 1967, an edition designed for high school students... 
  51. ^ a b c Karolides, Nicholas J.; Bald, Margaret; Sova, Dawn B. (2011). 120 Banned Books: Censorship Histories of World Literature (Second ed.). Checkmark Books. p. 488. ISBN 978-0-8160-8232-2. In 1967, Ballantine Books published a special edition of the novel to be sold in high schools. Over 75 passages were modified to eliminate such words as hell, damn, and abortion, and two incidents were eliminated. The original first incident described a drunk man who was changed to a sick man in the expurgated edition. In the second incident, reference is made to cleaning fluff out of the human navel, but the expurgated edition changed the reference to cleaning ears. 
  52. ^ Burress, Lee (1989). Battle of the Books: Literary Censorship in the Public Schools, 1950–1985. Scarecrow Press. p. 104. ISBN 0-8108-2151-6. 
  53. ^ a b c Greene, Bill (February 2007). "The mutilation and rebirth of a classic: Fahrenheit 451". Compass: New Directions at Falvey (Villanova University) III (3). Retrieved August 3, 2013. 
  54. ^ a b Karolides, Nicholas J.; Bald, Margaret; Sova, Dawn B. (2011). 120 Banned Books: Censorship Histories of World Literature (Second ed.). Checkmark Books. p. 488. ISBN 978-0-8160-8232-2. After six years of simultaneous editions, the publisher ceased publication of the adult version, leaving only the expurgated version for sale from 1973 through 1979, during which neither Bradbury nor anyone else suspected the truth. 
  55. ^ Crider, Bill (Fall 1980). Lee, Billy C.; Laughlin, Charlotte, eds. "Reprints/Reprints: Ray Bradbury's FAHRENHEIT 451". Paperback Quarterly III (3): 25. There is no mention anywhere on the Bal-Hi edition that it has been abridged, but printing histories in later Ballantine editions refer to the 'Revised Bal-Hi Editions.' 
  56. ^ Bradbury, Ray (2005). Fahrenheit 451. Read by Christopher Hurt (Unabridged ed.). Ashland, OR: Blackstone Audiobooks. ISBN 0-7861-7627-X.  CS1 maint: Extra text (link)
  57. ^ "Fahrenheit 451 becomes e-book despite author's feelings". BBC News. November 30, 2011. Retrieved August 24, 2013. 
  58. ^ Flood, Alison (November 30, 2011). "Fahrenheit 451 ebook published as Ray Bradbury gives in to digital era". The Guardian. Retrieved October 6, 2013. 
  59. ^ Conklin, Groff (February 1954). "Galaxy's 5 Star Shelf". Galaxy Science Fiction: 108. 
  60. ^ Derleth, August (October 25, 1953). "Vivid Prophecy of Book Burning". Chicago Sunday Tribune
  61. ^ Weller, Sam (2010). Listen to the Echoes: The Ray Bradbury Interviews. Brooklyn, NY: Melville House. p. 124. 
  62. ^ McNamee, Gregory (September 15, 2010). "Appreciations: Fahrenheit 451". Kirkus Reviews 78 (18): 882. 
  63. ^ "Recommended Reading," F&SF, December 1953, p. 105.
  64. ^ "The Reference Library", Astounding Science Fiction, April 1954, pp. 145–46
  65. ^ "Nothing but TV". The New York Times. November 14, 1953. 
  66. ^ a b c Karolides, Nicholas J.; Bald, Margaret; Sova, Dawn B. (2011). 120 Banned Books: Censorship Histories of World Literature (Second ed.). Checkmark Books. pp. 501–502. ISBN 978-0-8160-8232-2. 
  67. ^ a b Karolides, Nicholas J.; Bald, Margaret; Sova, Dawn B. (2011). 120 Banned Books: Censorship Histories of World Literature (Second ed.). Checkmark Books. p. 489. ISBN 978-0-8160-8232-2. In 1992, students of Venado Middle School in Irvine, California, were issued copies of the novel with numerous words blacked out. School officials had ordered teachers to use black markers to obliterate all of the 'hells,' 'damns,' and other words deemed 'obscene' in the books before giving them to students as required reading. Parents complained to the school and contacted local newspapers, who sent reporters to write stories about the irony of a book that condemns bookburning and censorship being expurgated. Faced with such an outcry, school officials announced that the censored copies would no longer be used. 
  68. ^ a b c Wrigley, Deborah (October 3, 2006). "Parent files complaint about book assigned as student reading". ABC News. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  69. ^ "Ticket to the Moon (tribute to SciFi)" (Ogg Vorbis). Biography in Sound. Narrated by Norman Rose. NBC Radio News. December 4, 1956. 27:10–27:57. Retrieved March 1, 2013. 
  70. ^ "The Definitive Biography in Sound Radio Log". Retrieved March 1, 2013. 
  71. ^ Quoted by Kingsley Amis in New Maps of Hell: A Survey of Science Fiction (1960). Bradbury directly foretells this incident early in the work: "And in her ears the little Seashells, the thimble radios tamped tight, and an electronic ocean of sound, of music and talk and music and talking coming in." p.12
  72. ^ a b Johnston, Amy E. Boyle (May 30, 2007). "Ray Bradbury: Fahrenheit 451 Misinterpreted". LA Weekly website. Retrieved August 3, 2013. Bradbury still has a lot to say, especially about how people do not understand his most famous literary work, Fahrenheit 451, published in 1953 ... Bradbury, a man living in the creative and industrial center of reality TV and one-hour dramas, says it is, in fact, a story about how television destroys interest in reading literature. 
  73. ^ Bradbury, Ray (2003). Fahrenheit 451 (50th anniversary ed.). New York, NY: Ballantine Books. pp. 175–179. ISBN 0-345-34296-8. 
  74. ^ Eller, Jonathan R.; Touponce, William F. (2004). Ray Bradbury: The Life of Fiction. Kent State University Press. p. 91. ISBN 9780873387798. The main target of Fahrenheit 451 is not censorship, as is often supposed, but rather mass culture... 
  75. ^ Reid, Robin Anne (2000). Ray Bradbury: A Critical Companion. Critical Companions to Popular Contemporary Writers. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. pp. 59–60. ISBN 0-313-30901-9. 
  76. ^ a b Aggelis, Steven L., ed. (2004). Conversations with Ray Bradbury. Interview by Shel Dorf. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi. p. 99. ISBN 1-57806-640-9. I am a preventor of futures, not a predictor of them. I wrote Fahrenheit 451 to prevent book-burnings, not to induce that future into happening, or even to say that it was inevitable. 
  77. ^ Aggelis, Steven L., ed. (2004). Conversations with Ray Bradbury. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi. p. 189. ISBN 1-57806-640-9. 
  78. ^ Weller, Sam (2010). Listen to the Echoes: The Ray Bradbury Interviews. Brooklyn, NY: Melville House. p. 263. 
  79. ^ Nolan, William F. (May 1963). "Bradbury: Prose Poet in the Age of Space". The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction: 7–21. 
  80. ^ Bowie, Stephen (August 17, 2010). "The Sound of a Single Drummer". The Classic TV History Blog. wordpress.com. Retrieved August 29, 2013. 
  81. ^ Fahrenheit 451 at the Internet Movie Database
  82. ^ Frey, James N. (2010). How to Write a Damn Good Thriller: A Step-by-Step Guide for Novelists and Screenwriters (1st ed.). Macmillan. p. 255. ISBN 978-0-312-57507-6. Retrieved 5 March 2014. FAHRENHEIT 451* (1966); written by François Truffaut from the novel by Ray Bradbury; starring Oskar Werner and Julie Christie; directed by François Truffaut. 
  83. ^ "Ray Bradbury Radio Plays". Diversity Website. Retrieved June 7, 2012. 
  84. ^ "BBC iPlayer – Ray Bradbury – Fahrenheit 451". Retrieved February 19, 2012. 
  85. ^ "Ray Bradbury – Fahrenheit 451". BBC Radio 4 Extra. Retrieved 6 November 2013. 
  86. ^ Merciez, Gil (May 1985). "Fahrenheit 451". Antic's Amiga Plus 5 (1): 81. 
  87. ^ Genzlinger, Neil (March 25, 2006). "Godlight Theater's 'Fahrenheit 451' Offers Hot Ideas for the Information Age". The New York Times. Retrieved March 2, 2013. 
  88. ^ "The Edinburgh festival 2006 – Reviews – Theatre 'F' – 8 out of 156". Edinburghguide.com. Retrieved June 15, 2013. 
  89. ^ "Literature to Life – Citizenship & Censorship: Raise Your Civic Voice in 2008–09". The American Place Theatre. Archived from the original on November 10, 2009. 
  90. ^ "Macmillan: Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451: The Authorized Adaptation Ray Bradbury, Tim Hamilton: Books". Us.macmillan.com. 
  91. ^ Neary, Lynn (July 30, 2009). "Reimagining 'Fahrenheit 451' As A Graphic Novel". All Things Considered. NPR. Retrieved 17 March 2014. 
  92. ^ Maury, Laurel (July 30, 2009). "Bradbury Classic In Vivid, 'Necessary' Graphic Form". NPR. Retrieved 17 March 2014. 
  93. ^ Edvardsen, Mette. "Time Has Fallen Asleep In The Afternoon Sunshine Presented at Birmingham Central Library". Retrieved March 22, 2013. 

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