Double Indemnity

References

  1. ^ Sikov, Ed (1998). On Sunset Boulevard: The Life and Times of Billy Wilder. New York: Hyperion. ISBN 978-0-7868-6194-1. p. 211
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Shadows of Suspense". Double Indemnity Universal Legacy Series DVD (Universal Studios). 2006. 
  3. ^ While the story certainly used the Snyder case as a framework, it lacked an important ingredient of the Double Indemnity structure: the "inside-guy accomplice" to the murder – the Walter Neff character. Cain later recalled this key innovation stemmed from a conversation he had years earlier with reporter Arthur Krock about Krock's days at the Louisville Courier-Journal. An ad for ladies underwear was typeset to read: IF THESE SIZES ARE TOO BIG, TAKE A TUCK IN THEM. But when the paper hit the street, the T in tuck had been changed to an F. A furious Krock reset the ad for the next edition and demanded an explanation on how it happened. After two days of bullying the printer, the man finally confessed, "…you do nothing your whole life but watch for something like that happening, so as to head it off, and then, Mr. Krock, you catch yourself watching for chances to do it." Cain also recalled another conversation he had with some insurance men in Los Angeles while verifying facts for Postman. Said one: "[People] think this stuff all comes from the police. That’s wrong. All the big crime mysteries in this country are locked up in insurance company files, and the writer that gets wise to that... is going to make himself rich." And thus was born Neff, who jumped the tracks after fifteen years playing it straight in the insurance business. Armed now with a sense of his hero-gone-wrong, Cain sat down to begin writing the story in 1934. (Source: Hoopes (1982), Cain.)
  4. ^ Gallo, Bill (2005). "When 'Dem Bums' Were Kings," New York Daily News, October 4, 2005.
  5. ^ Lally, Kevin (1996). Wilder Times: The Life of Billy Wilder. New York: Henry Holt and Company. pp. 125–126. ISBN 978-0-8050-3119-5. 
  6. ^ Lally, p. 126
  7. ^ Phillips, Gene D. (2010). Some Like it Wilder: The Life and Controversial Films of Billy Wilder. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky. p. 54. ISBN 978-0-8131-2570-1. 
  8. ^ Lally, p. 127
  9. ^ Hoopes, Roy (1982). Cain. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston. pp. 347–348. ISBN 978-0-03-049331-7. 
  10. ^ McGilligan, Patrick (1986). Backstory: Interviews with Screenwriters of Hollywood's Golden Age. Los Angeles: University of California Press. ISBN 978-0-520-05689-3. p.127
  11. ^ Lally, p. 128
  12. ^ Phillips, Gene D. (2000). Creatures of Darkness: Raymond Chandler, Detective Fiction, and Film Noir. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky. p. 170. ISBN 978-0-8131-2174-1. 
  13. ^ Phillips, Creatures, p. 170
  14. ^ Phillips, Some Like, p 17.
  15. ^ Wooton, Adrian (June 5, 2009). "Chandler's double identity". The Guardian. Retrieved June 7, 2009. 
  16. ^ Lally, p. 129
  17. ^ Phillips, Creatures, p. 181
  18. ^ McGilligan, p. 125
  19. ^ Sikov, pp. 197–213
  20. ^ Muller, Eddie (1998). Dark City: The Lost World of Film Noir. New York: St. Martin's Press. ISBN 978-0-312-18076-8. p. 56
  21. ^ Flint, Peter B. "Fred MacMurray Is Dead at 83; Versatile Film and Television Star." The New York Times, November 6, 1991. MacMurray made $420,000 in 1943.
  22. ^ a b c d Lally, p. 135
  23. ^ a b Lally, p. 134
  24. ^ Zolotow, Maurice (1977). Billy Wilder In Hollywood. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons. ISBN 978-0-399-11789-3. p. 117.
  25. ^ Phillips, Some Like, p. 61
  26. ^ Sikov, p. 202
  27. ^ Sikov, p. 203
  28. ^ a b Zolotow, p. 118
  29. ^ Biography: Tom Powers, IMDb
  30. ^ a b Lally, p. 137
  31. ^ Phillips, Creatures, p. 180
  32. ^ Lally, p. 138
  33. ^ Lally, p. 124
  34. ^ Lally, p. 136
  35. ^ Sikov, p. 206
  36. ^ Phillips, Some Like, p. 63
  37. ^ Muller, p. 58
  38. ^ Sikov, p. 207
  39. ^ Sixteen years later, Wilder would score notability again with the design of an insurance company office: in 1960's The Apartment, he and art director Alexandre Trauner constructed a huge office made even more intimidating by bending "parallel" lines inward and using progressively smaller and smaller desks – and smaller and smaller extras to populate them – farther back from the camera, to make the cavernous, harshly-lit space seem even more vast. (Source: Ebert, Roger. The Chicago Sun Times, film review.)
  40. ^ a b Phillips, Some Like, p. 62
  41. ^ Phillips, Creatures, pp. 175-176
  42. ^ Zolotow, p. 116
  43. ^ Sikov, p. 211
  44. ^ a b Sikov, pp. 210–211
  45. ^ Rózsa, Miklós (1982). Double Life: The Autobiography of Miklós Rózsa. New York: Hippocrene Books. ISBN 978-0-88254-688-9. p. 119
  46. ^ Rózsa, pp. 121
  47. ^ a b Rózsa, pp. 122
  48. ^ Prinzing, Debra. "Mae Brunken's Beachwood Canyon Home in the Hollywood Hills." Los Angeles Times. September 4, 2009.
  49. ^ Sandell, Scott (November 7, 2008). "Sex, death and architecture: an L.A. noir tour". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on July 14, 2010. Retrieved July 14, 2010. 
  50. ^ Cress, Robby (May 17, 2009). "Double Identity: Film Locations". The Guardian. Retrieved July 24, 2010. 
  51. ^ a b Sikov, p. 213
  52. ^ McGilligan, p. 128
  53. ^ a b Lally, p. 139
  54. ^ a b c Hoopes, p. 347
  55. ^ Walker, John (ed.) Halliwell's Film Guide, New York: HarperPerennial, 1994, p.344 ISBN 978-0-06-273241-5
  56. ^ Roger Ebert "Double Indemnity (1944)", Chicago Sun-Times, December 20, 1998. Last accessed: December 29, 2007
  57. ^ Sklar, Robert. Film: An International History of the Medium. London: Thames and Hudson, c. 1990. p. 305
  58. ^ Sklar, 309
  59. ^ Lesser, Wendy. "His Other Half: Men Looking at Women Through Art." Google Books. 24 April 2014.
  60. ^ "The 17th Academy Awards (1945) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Retrieved 2011-08-15. 
  61. ^ Lally, p. 140
  62. ^ Zolotow, p. 123
  63. ^ http://www.audio-classics.com/lthescreenguildtheater.html
  64. ^ http://www.audio-classics.com/lthefordtheater.html
  65. ^ http://www.audio-classics.com/lluxradio.html
  66. ^ Double Indemnity (1973) at the Internet Movie Database. Passenger travel by train was so passé by 1973 that the latter-day scripters had to add an exchange where Phyllis asks Neff about the role of the train in his plan, and Neff answers that there is still a passenger train that runs up the West Coast.
  67. ^ Dixon, Wheeler. "Senses of Cinema". Retrieved July 26, 2010. 
  68. ^ Muller, p. 59
  69. ^ Sikov, p. 212
  70. ^ "One Head Is Better Than Two," in Films and Filming (London), February 1957.
  71. ^ Chandler, Charlotte, (2002). Nobody's Perfect: Billy Wilder, A Personal Biography. New York: Simon & Schuster. ISBN 978-0-7432-1709-5. p. 114

This content is from Wikipedia. GradeSaver is providing this content as a courtesy until we can offer a professionally written study guide by one of our staff editors. We do not consider this content professional or citable. Please use your discretion when relying on it.