Cryptonomicon

Literary significance and criticism

According to critic Jay Clayton, the book is written for a technical or geek audience.[6] Despite the technical detail, the book drew praise from both Stephenson's science fiction fan base and literary critics and buyers.[7][8] In his book Charles Dickens in Cyberspace: The Afterlife of the Nineteenth Century in Postmodern Culture (2003), Jay Clayton calls Stephenson’s book the “ultimate geek novel” and draws attention to the “literary-scientific-engineering-military-industrial-intelligence alliance” that produced discoveries in two eras separated by fifty years, World War II and the Internet age.[6] In July 2012, io9 included the book on its list of "10 Science Fiction Novels You Pretend to Have Read".[9]


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