Critique of Pure Reason

Notes

  1. ^ German Wikisource
  2. ^ Graham Bird (1995). Ted Honderich, ed. The Oxford Companion to Philosophy. Oxford: Oxford University Press. p. 439. ISBN 0-19-866132-0. 
  3. ^ Leibniz, New Essays on Human Understanding, eds. Remnant and Bennett, p.361 ISBN 0-521-57660-1
  4. ^ [ibid.]
  5. ^ Russell, Bertrand (2008). The Problems of Philosophy. Arc Manor LLC. pp. 56–57. ISBN 978-1-60450-085-1. 
  6. ^ Adler, Mortimer J. (1996). Ten Philosophical Mistakes. Simon & Schuster. p. 94. ISBN 0-684-81868-X. 
  7. ^ a b Bertrand Russell. The Problems of Philosophy. p. 57. ISBN 0-87220-099-X. 
  8. ^ Joad, C.E.M. (1957). Guide to Philosophy. Dover Publications Inc. p. 361. ISBN 978-0-486-20297-6. 
  9. ^ Charles George Herbermann et al. (eds.). The Catholic encyclopedia 10. p. 232. 
  10. ^ Watson, John (1908). The philosophy of Kant explained. J. Maclehose. pp. 62–72. ISBN 0-8240-2335-8. 
  11. ^ Makkreel, Rudolf A. (1995). Imagination and Interpretation in Kant. University of Chicago Press. p. 21. ISBN 0-226-50277-5. 
  12. ^ Chadwick, Ruth F.; Cazeaux, Clive (1992). Immanuel Kant, Critical Assessments: Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. Routledge. p. 43. ISBN 0-415-07411-8. 
  13. ^ Angeles, Peter A. (1992). Eugene Ehrlich, ed. The Harper Collins Dictionary of Philosophy. Harper Collins. p. 149. ISBN 0-06-461026-8. 
  14. ^ Solomon, Robert C. (2001). From Rationalism to Existentialism. Rowman & Littlefield. p. 21. ISBN 0-7425-1241-X. In the Transcendental Deduction, Kant distinguishes the transcendental ego from the empirical ego and maintains that only the transcendental ego has these a priori relations with experience. 
  15. ^ Caygill 1995, p. 146
  16. ^ Gardner, Sebastian (1999). Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Kant and the Critique of Pure Reason. Routledge. ISBN 0-415-11908-1. 
  17. ^ Henry E. Allison. Kant's Transcendental Idealism. p. 19. ISBN 0-300-03002-9. 
  18. ^ Robert Maynard Hutchins, ed. (1952). Great Books of the Western World 42. William Benton/Encyclopædia Britannica Inc. p. 24. LCCN 55-10348. 
  19. ^ a b c d Sebastian Gardner. Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Kant and the Critique of Pure Reason. ISBN 0-415-11909-X. 
  20. ^ Senderowics, Yaron M. (2005). The Coherence of Kant's Transcendental Idealism. Springer. p. 270. ISBN 978-1-4020-2581-5. The problem addressed by Kant presupposes the results of the Transcendental Aesthetics. 
  21. ^ Laird, John (2010) [1917]. Problems of the Self. Forgotten Books. p. 331. ISBN 1-4400-8391-6. ... Kant hunts the paralogism which attempts to prove the existence of spiritual substance... 
  22. ^ Ruth F. Chadwick/Clive Cazeaux. Immanuel Kant, Critical Assessments. p. 104. ... the self is an intrinsically important topic and absolutely central to Kant's philosophy,,, 
  23. ^ Svare, Helge (2006). Body and Practice in Kant. Springer. p. 263. ISBN 1-4020-4118-7. Thus, like logic in general, transcendental logic is the result of a process of abstraction in which something originally part of a more comprehensive context is isolated and then examined in this isolated state. 
  24. ^ a b Immanuel Kant, Critique of Pure Reason, trans. and ed. by Paul Guyer and Allen W. Wood, Cambridge Univ. Press, 1998, pp. 8-9 (translators' introduction).
  25. ^ Roy Wood Sellars (1917). The essentials of philosophy. The Macmillan Co. p. 83. 
  26. ^ Howell, Robert (1992). Kant's Transcendental Deduction. Springer. p. 25. ISBN 0-7923-1571-5. The basic strand of his argument runs as follows. 
  27. ^ Heidegger, Martin (1997). Phenomenological Interpretation of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. Indiana University Press. p. 292. ISBN 0-253-33258-3. In the schematism Kant attempts to grasp the synthesis a priori of the productive power of imagination in a unified and original manner. 
  28. ^ Hartnack, Justus (2001). Kant's Theory of Knowledge: An Introduction to the Critique of Pure Reason. Hackett Publishing. p. 87. ISBN 0-87220-506-1. 
  29. ^ Wood, Allen W. (2005). Kant. Wiley-Blackwell. p. 84. ISBN 0-631-23282-6. ... Ideas are such that no sensible intuition corresponding to them could ever be given in our experience. 
  30. ^ Allen W. Wood. Kant. p. 84. ISBN 0-375-75733-3. ... Our faculty of reason, when it functions properly, makes us subject to certain conceptual illusions or sophistical lines of reasoning... 
  31. ^ Atkins, Kim (2005). Self and Subjectivity. Wiley-Blackwell. p. 48. ISBN 1-4051-1204-2. Our understanding and experiences are limited a priori to the modes of representation enabled by the categories. Importantly the categories only produce knowledge (or experience, that is, empirical concepts) when they are applied to intuitions. It is this principle that runs through all of Kant's arguments in the Paralogisms of Pure Reason. 
  32. ^ Kim Atkins. Self and Subjectivity. p. 49. ISBN 1-4051-1205-0. 
  33. ^ Kim Atkins. Self and Subjectivity. pp. 49–50. ISBN 1-4051-1205-0. 
  34. ^ Powell, C. Thomas (1990). Kant's Theory of Self-Consciousness. Oxford University Press. pp. 174, 185, 188. ISBN 0-19-824448-7. The Fourth Paralogism is, in a sense, something of a stepchild, either passed in silence or given minimal treatment in any discussion of the Paralogisms proper. 
  35. ^ Beiser, Frederick C. (2002). German Idealism: the struggle against subjectivism, 1781-1801. Harvard University Press. p. 63. ISBN 0-674-00769-7. For Kant, the great value of skeptical idealism is that it demands some proof or reason for our ordinary beliefs. 
  36. ^ Bennett, Jonathan Francis (1974). Kant's Dialetics. CUP Archive. p. 72. ISBN 0-521-09849-1. Since the fourth paralogism is misplaced, I shall say no more about it. 
  37. ^ Pittman, John (1997). African-American Perspectives and Philosophical Traditions. Routledge. pp. 188–189. ISBN 0-415-91639-9. The neglect of contemporary ethicists of Kant's first Critique has been particularly unfortunate. 
  38. ^ Sorensen, Roy A. (2003). A Brief History of the Paradox: philosophy and the labyrinths of the mind. Oxford University Press US. p. 287. ISBN 0-19-515903-9. 
  39. ^ Roy A. Sorensen. A Brief History of the Paradox. p. 294. ISBN 0-19-515903-9. 
  40. ^ Allison, Henry E. (2004). Kant's Transcendental Idealism. Yale University Press. p. 397. ISBN 0-300-10266-6. 
  41. ^ Heidegger, Martin (1988). The Basic Problems of Phenomenology. Indiana University Press. p. 30. ISBN 0-253-20478-X. A peculiar feature of this proof is that it tries to infer God's existence from his concept. The philosophical science which in Kant's opinion starts purely from concepts... is ontology... That is why Kant calls this proof... the ontological proof. 
  42. ^ McGrath, Alister E. (2006). The Christian Theology Reader. Wiley-Blackwell. p. 35. ISBN 1-4051-5358-X. Now "Being" is clearly not a genuine predicate: that is, it is not a concept of something which could be added to the concept of a thing. It is merely the positing of a thing, or of certain determinations, as existing in themselves. 
  43. ^ Byrne, Peter (2007). Kant on God. Ashgate Publishing Ltd. pp. 32–36. ISBN 0-7546-4023-X. 
  44. ^ Caygill 1995, p. 391
  45. ^ Ewald, William Bragg (2008). From Kant to Hilbert: a source book in the foundations of mathematics. Oxford University Press US. p. 136. ISBN 0-19-850535-3. 
  46. ^ a b Watkins 2005, p. 375
  47. ^ Watkins 2005, p. 376
  48. ^ Watkins 2005, p. 378
  49. ^ Caygill 1995, p. 98
  50. ^ Caygill 1995, pp. 98–99
  51. ^ Caygill 1995, p. 144
  52. ^ Caygill 1995, p. 110
  53. ^ Caygill 1995, p. 292
  54. ^ Caygill 1995, p. 149
  55. ^ Marbaniang, Domenic. "Kant's Table of Judgments of Reason and the Categories of Understanding". Marbaniang. Retrieved 11 October 2014. 

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