Clarissa

Bibliography

Most entries below from the Richardson Bibliography by John A. Dussinger

  • John Carroll, "Lovelace as Tragic Hero," University of Toronto Quarterly 42 (1972): 14–25.
  • Anthony Winner, "Richardson's Lovelace: Character and Prediction," Texas Studies in Literature and Language 14 (1972): 53–75.
  • Jonathan Loesberg, "Allegory and Narrative in Clarissa," Novel 15 (Fall 1981): 39–59.
  • Leo Braudy, "Penetration and Impenetrability in Clarissa," in New Aspects of the Eighteenth Century: Essays from the English Institute, ed. Philip Harth (New York: Columbia Univ. Press, 1974).
  • John Traugott, "Molesting Clarissa," Novel 15 (1982): 163–70.
  • Sue Warrick Doederlein, "Clarissa in the Hands of the Critics," Eighteenth-Century Studies 16 (1983): 401–14.
  • Terry Castle, "Lovelace's Dream," Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture 13 (1984): 29–42.
  • Sarah Fielding, Remarks on 'Clarissa', introduction by Peter Sabor (Augustan Reprint Society, 231–32). Facsimile reprint 1749 (Los Angeles: William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, 1985).
  • Florian Stuber, "On Fathers and Authority in 'Clarissa'," 25 (Summer 1985): 557–74.
  • Donald R. Wehrs, "Irony, Storytelling and the Conflict of Interpretation in Clarissa, ELH 53 (1986): 759–78.
  • Margaret Anne Doody, "Disguise and Personality in Richardson's Clarissa," Eighteenth-Century Life n.s. 12, no. 2 (1988): 18–39.
  • Jonathan Lamb, "The Fragmentation of Originals and Clarissa," SEL 28 (1988): 443–59.
  • Raymond Stephanson, "Richardson's 'Nerves': The Philosophy of Sensibility in 'Clarissa'," Journal of the History of Ideas 49 (1988): 267–85.
  • Peter Hynes, "Curses, Oaths, and Narrative in Richardson's 'Clarissa'," ELH 56 (1989): 311–26.
  • Brenda Bean, "Sight and Self-Disclosure: Richardson's Revision of Swift's 'The Lady's Dressing Room,'" Eighteenth-Century Life 14 (1990): 1–23.
  • Thomas O. Beebee, "Clarissa" on the Continent: Translation and Seduction (University Park: Pennsylvania State Univ., 1990).
  • Jocelyn Harris, "Protean Lovelace," Eighteenth-Century Fiction 2 (1990): 327–46.
  • Raymond F. Hilliard, "Clarissa and Ritual Cannibalism," PMLA 105 (1990): 1083–97.
  • Nicholas Hudson, "Arts of Seduction and the Rhetoric of Clarissa," Modern Language Quarterly 51 (1990): 25–43.
  • Helen M. Ostovich, "'Our Views Must Now Be Different': Imprisonment and Friendship in 'Clarissa'," Modern Language Quarterly 52 (1991): 153–69.
  • Tom Keymer, Richardson's "Clarissa" and the Eighteenth-Century Reader (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1992). Probably the most important book-length study of Richardson after the first wave of Kinkead-Weakes, Doody, Flynn, and others in the 1970s and 1980s.
  • David C. Hensley, "Thomas Edwards and the Dialectics of Clarissa's Death Scene," Eighteenth-Century Life 16, no. 3 (1992): 130–52.
  • Lois A. Chaber, "A 'Fatal Attraction'? The BBC and Clarissa," Eighteenth-Century Fiction 4 (April 1992): 257–63.
  • Mildred Sarah Greene, "The French Clarissa," in Man and Nature: Proceedings of the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, ed. Christa Fell and James Leith (Edmonton: Academic Printing & Publishing, 1992), pp. 89–98.
  • Elizabeth W. Harries, "Fragments and Mastery: Dora and Clarissa," Eighteenth-Century Fiction 5 (April 1993): 217–38.
  • Richard Hannaford, "Playing Her Dead Hand: Clarissa's Posthumous Letters," Texas Studies in Literature and Language 35 (Spring 1993): 79–102.
  • Lois E. Bueler, Clarissa's Plots (Newark, DE: Associated Univ. Presses, 1994).
  • Tom Keymer, "Clarissa's Death, Clarissa's Sale, and the Text of the Second Edition," Review of English Studies 45 (Aug. 1994): 389–96.
  • Martha J. Koehler, "Epistolary Closure and Triangular Return in Richardson's 'Clarissa'," Journal of Narrative Technique 24 (Fall 1994): 153–72.
  • Margaret Anne Doody, "Heliodorus Rewritten: Samuel Richardson's 'Clarissa' and Frances Burney's 'Wanderer'," in The Search for the Ancient Novel, ed. James Tatum (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, 1994), pp. 117–31.
  • Joy Kyunghae Lee, "The Commodification of Virtue: Chastity and the Virginal Body in Richardson's 'Clarissa'," The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation 36 (Spring 1995): 38–54.
  • Mary Vermillion, "Clarissa and the Marriage Act," Eighteenth-Century Fiction 10 (1997): 395–412.
  • Daniel P. Gunn, "Is Clarissa Bourgois Art?" Eighteenth-Century Fiction 10 (Oct. 1997): 1–14.
  • Brian McCrea, "Clarissa's Pregnancy and the Fate of Patriarchal Power," Eighteenth-Century Fiction 9 (Jan. 1997): 125–48.
  • Mary Patricia Martin, "Reading Reform in Richardson's 'Clarissa' and the Tactics of Sentiment," SEL 37 (Summer 1997): 595–614.
  • Paul Gordon Scott, "Disinterested Selves: Clarissa and the Tactics of Sentiment," ELH 64 (1997): 473–502.
  • Donnalee Frega, Speaking in Hunger: Gender, Discourse, and Consumption in "Clarissa" (Columbia, SC: Univ. of South Carolina Press, 1998).
  • Laura Hinton, "The Heroine's Subjection: Clarissa, Sadomasochism, and Natural Law," Eighteenth-Century Studies 32 (Spring 1999): 293–308.
  • Murray L. Brown, "Authorship and Generic Exploitation: Why Lovelace Must Fear Clarissa," SNNTS 30 (Summer 1998): 246–59.
  • Derek Taylor, "Clarissa Harlowe, Mary Astell, and Elizabeth Carter: John Norris of Bemerton's Female 'Descendants,'" Eighteenth-Century Fiction 12 (Oct. 1999): 19–38.
  • Krake, Astrid (2000). "How art produces art: Samuel Richardson’s Clarissa". Spiegel ihrer deutschen Übersetzungen. Frankfurt: Peter Lang. 
  • —————— (2006). "He could go no farther: The Rape of Clarissa in 18th-Century Translations". In Cointre, Annie; Lautel-Ribstein, Florence; Rivara, Annie. La traduction du discours amoureux (1660–1830). Metz: CETT. .
  • Townsend, Alex, Autonomous Voices: An Exploration of Polyphony in the Novels of Samuel Richardson, 2003, Oxford, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt/M., New York, Wien, 2003, ISBN 978-3-906769-80-6 / US-ISBN 978-0-8204-5917-2
  • (simplified Chinese) Hou, Jian. "Haoqiu Zhuan yu Clarissa: Liangzhong shehui jiazhi de aiqing gushi" (A Tale of Chivalry and Love and Clarissa: romantic fiction based on two distinct social value systems), Zhongguo xiaoshuo bijiao yanjiu, p. 95-116.

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