Call of the Wild

Call of the wild

Why was Thornton an ideal master? What words does the author use to describe him? Describe bucks feelings for thorton. How does her view him? Use examples from the text. How does knowing both perspectives create the mood of fanily?

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In Chapter Six, the reader sees a vision of the ideal relationship between man and dog. John Thornton and Buck's connection goes far beyond the working relationship that Buck had with Francois and Perrault. He respected those men for their understanding of dogs and of nature, but he had no great affection for them. John Thornton is "the ideal master," for he understands Buck without difficulty or confusion. Buck loves him because he shows his need for Buck, repeatedly demonstrating that Buck can help him in ways that others can't. When Buck wins him 1600 dollars or saves him from a deadly rapid, John Thornton is honoring Buck, honoring his power and his loyalty. This loyalty goes beyond the loyalty of the team. Buck depended on those dogs for his life, but he depends on John Thornton for his happiness.

Other men saw to the welfare of their dogs from a sense of duty and business expediency; he saw to the welfare of his as if they were his own children, because he could not help it. And he saw further. He never forgot a kindly greeting or a cheering word, and to sit down for a long talk with them--"gas" he called it--was as much his delight as theirs. He had a way of taking Buck's head roughly between his hands, and resting his own head upon Buck's, of shaking him back and forth, the while calling him ill names that to Buck were love names. Buck knew no greater joy than that rough embrace and the sound of murmured oaths, and at each jerk back and forth it seemed that his heart would be shaken out of his body, so great was its ecstasy. And when, released, he sprang to his feet, his mouth laughing, his eyes eloquent, his throat vibrant with unuttered sound, and in that fashion remained without movement, John Thornton would reverently exclaim, "God! you can all but speak!"

Source(s); Call of the Wild