Brave New World

An Analysis of Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

In the science fiction novel Brave New World, Aldous Huxley shows a "revolution of revolutions" resulting from technological advances. He does so by portraying a future BNW society that is supposedly perfect in every way. Everyone is happy. Everything exists in perfect order. Huxley, however, focuses on warning the reader about problems that may develop in the future such as promiscuity, lack of intimacy, etc. This future is indeed a "revolution of revolutions" in that societal norms go through a radical change into completely innovative, but sometimes corrupt, forms.

This revolution is a direct result of a "Nine Years War:" a war so devastating that it nearly extinguishes life on earth. Near the end of this period, humanity as a whole grows tired of war and destruction, and therefore decides to search for answers through other means. The answer is found in advanced technology. Attributing their new foundation to the industrial enterpriser, Henry Ford, the BNW society begins to take shape. Its motto becomes "community, identity, stability," and anything that promotes social disorder is quickly eliminated. This element precludes individuality and will later incite conflict. Everyone thinks...

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