Animal Farm

What are Mollie's and Boxer's quotes

At least 10

Asked by
Last updated by jill d #170087
Answers 3
Add Yours


A thought struck Clover. Without saying anything to the others, she went to Mollie's stall and turned over the straw with her hoof. Hidden under the straw was a little pile of lump sugar and several bunches of ribbon of different colours."- Chapter Five.

"Three days later Mollie disappeared. For some weeks nothing was known of her whereabouts, then the pigeons reported that they had seen her on the other side of Willingdon. She was between the shafts of a smart dogcart painted red and black, which was standing outside a public-house. A fat red-faced man in check breeches and gaiters, who looked like a publican, was stroking her nose and feeding her with sugar. Her coat was newly clipped and she wore a scarlet ribbon round her forelock. She appeared to be enjoying herself, so the pigeons said. None of the animals ever mentioned Mollie again." -Chapter Five

"Mollie refused to learn any but the six letters which spelt her own name. She would form these very neatly out of pieces of twig, and would then decorate them with a flower or two and walk round them admiring them."- Chapter Three

"The stupidest questions of all were asked by Mollie, the white mare. The very first question she asked Snowball was: "Will there still be sugar after the Rebellion?""-Chapter Two

"They were just coming down the stairs when Mollie was discovered to be missing. Going back, the others found that she had remained behind in the best bedroom. She had taken a piece of blue ribbon from Mrs. Jones's dressing-table, and was holding it against her shoulder and admiring herself in the glass in a very foolish manner. The others reproached her sharply, and they went outside."- Chapter Two


Animal Farm

Molly “took a place near the front and began flirting her white mane, hoping to draw attention to the red ribbons it was plaited with” (1.4).

“Will there be sugar after the rebellion?” (2.3)

After the rebellion, as the animals are going through the farmhouse, they lose track of Mollie. When they find her, “she had taken a piece of blue ribbon from Mrs. Jones’s dressing-table, and was holding it against her shoulder and admiring herself in the glass in a very foolish manner” (2.18)


He is first introduced as “an enormous beast, nearly eighteen hands high, and as strong as any two ordinary horses put together [...] he was not of first-rate intelligence, but he was universally respected for his steadiness of character and tremendous powers of work” (1.3).

After the rebellion, Boxer amazes everyone with his work ethic; he makes his personal motto, “I will work harder” (3.3).

In the Battle of the Cowshed, he fights bravely. The narrator tells us, “the most terrifying spectacle of all was Boxer, rearing up on his hind legs and striking out with his great iron-shod hoofs like a stallion” (4.8).

After Snowball is sent into exile, Boxer tries to think things over for himself. Yet all he can conclude is “If Comrade Napoleon says it, it must be right,” and he takes up a new personal motto: “Napoleon is always right” (5.22).

When Napoleon begins executing other animals, Boxer can only say, “I would not have believed that such things could happen on our farm. It must be due to some fault in ourselves. The solution, as I see it, is to work harder” (7.28).