Alice Munro: Short Stories

Notes and references

  1. ^ a b c Preface. Dance of the Happy Shades. Alice Munro. First Vintage contemporaries Edition, August 1998. ISBN 0-679-78151-X Vintage Books, A Division of Random House, Inc. New York.
  2. ^ Alice Munro Wins Nobel Prize in Literature, by Julie Bosmans, The New York Times, 10 October 2013
  3. ^ W.H. New, Literature in English, thecanadianencyclopedia.com, 2 December 2012, last edited 16 December 2013.
  4. ^ Marchand, P. (29 August 2009). "Open Book: Philip Marchand on Too Much Happiness, by Alice Munro". The National Post. Retrieved 5 September 2009. 
  5. ^ Meyer, M. "Alice Munro". Meyer Literature. Archived from the original on 12 December 2007. Retrieved 21 November 2007. 
  6. ^ Merkin, Daphne (24 October 2004). "Northern Exposures". New York Times Magazine. Retrieved 25 February 2008. 
  7. ^ a b c d "The Nobel Prize in Literature 2013 – Press Release" (PDF). 10 October 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  8. ^ a b Bosman, Julie (10 October 2013). "Alice Munro Wins Nobel Prize in Literature". New York Times. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  9. ^ "Alice Munro wins Man Booker International prize". The Guardian. 27 May 2009. 
  10. ^ a b "Past Writers' Trust Engel/Findley Award Winners". Retrieved 7 April 2014. 
  11. ^ Jeanne McCulloch, Mona Simpson "Alice Munro, The Art of Fiction No. 137", The Paris Review No. 131, Summer 1994
  12. ^ a b Jason Winders (10 October 2013). "Alice Munro, LLD'76, wins 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature". Western News. The University of Western Ontario. 
  13. ^ "Canada's Alice Munro, 'master' of short stories, wins Nobel Prize in literature". CNN. 10 October 2013. Retrieved 11 October 2013. 
  14. ^ "Past GG Winners 1968". canadacouncil.ca. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  15. ^ "Past GG Winners 1978". canadacouncil.ca. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  16. ^ "Alice Munro wins Nobel Prize for Literature". BBC News. 10 October 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  17. ^ Saul Bellow, the 1976 laureate, was born in Canada, but he moved to the United States at age nine and became a US citizen at twenty-six.
  18. ^ Panofsky, Ruth (2012). The Literary Legacy of the Macmillan Company of Canada: Making Books and Mapping Culture. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. ISBN 9780802098771. 
  19. ^ "Munro follows publisher Gibson from Macmillan". Toronto Star, April 30, 1986.
  20. ^ "Alice Munro unlikely to come out of retirement following Nobel win". CTV News, October 11, 2013.
  21. ^ Which of the stories have free Web versions.
  22. ^ For further details, see List of short stories by Alice Munro.
  23. ^ Susanne Becker, Gothic Forms of Feminine Fictions. Manchester University Press, 1999.
  24. ^ Holcombe, Garan (2005). "Alice Munro". Contemporary Writers. London: British Arts Council. Retrieved 20 June 2007. 
  25. ^ Hoy, Helen (1980). "Dull, Simple, Amazing and Unfathomable: Paradox and Double Vision In Alice Munro's Fiction". Studies in Canadian Literature (University of New Brunswick) 5 (1). Retrieved 20 June 2007. 
  26. ^ Thacker, Robert (1998) Review of Some other reality: Alice Munro's Something I've been Meaning to Tell You, by Louis K. MacKendrick. Journal of Canadian Studies, Summer 1998.
  27. ^ Keegan, Alex (August–September 1998). "Munro: The Short Answer". Eclectica 2 (5). Archived from the original on 25 June 2007. Retrieved 20 June 2007. 
  28. ^ J.R. (Tim) Struthers, Some Highly Subversive Activities: A Brief Polemic and a Checklist of Works on Alice Munro, in: Studies in Canadian Literature / Études en littérature canadienne (SCL/ÉLC), Volume 06, Number 1 (1981).
  29. ^ The Art of Alice Munro: Saying the Unsayable (1984) was edited by Judith Miller. Source: Héliane Ventura, Introduction to Special issue: The Short Stories of Alice Munro, Journal of the Short Story in English / Les Cahiers de la nouvelle, No. 55, Autumn 2010.
  30. ^ Journal of the Short Story in English (JSSE)/Les cahiers de la nouvelle special issue
  31. ^ For details please see List of short stories by Alice Munro
  32. ^ An Appreciation of Alice Munro, by Ann Close and Lisa Dickler Awano, Compiler and Editor. In: The Virginia Quarterly Review. VQR Symposium on Alice Munro. Summer 2006, S. 102–105.
  33. ^ a b c Lisa Dickler Awano, Kindling The Creative Fire: Alice Munro’s Two Versions of “Wood”, New Haven Review, 30 May 2012.
  34. ^ "Gerald Fremlin (obituary)". Clinton News-Record. April 2013. Retrieved 1 July 2013. 
  35. ^ The Canadian Press (22 October 2009). "Alice Munro reveals cancer fight". CBC News. Retrieved 11 March 2010. 
  36. ^ a b Besner, Neil K., "Introducing Alice Munro's Lives of Girls and Women: A Reader's Guide" (Toronto: ECW Press), 1990
  37. ^ See List of short stories by Alice Munro
  38. ^ "Past Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize Winners". Retrieved 7 April 2014. 
  39. ^ "Trillium Book Award Winners". omdc.on.ca
  40. ^ "Medal Day History". MacDowell Colony. Retrieved 1 July 2015. 
  41. ^ The Booker Prize Foundation "Alice Munro wins 2009 Man Booker International Prize."
  42. ^ "ARCHIVED – Canada Gazette – GOVERNMENT HOUSE". Gazette.gc.ca. 9 November 2012. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  43. ^ "Mint releases silver coin to honour Alice Munro’s Nobel win". The Globe and Mail. 24 March 2014. Retrieved 7 April 2014. 
  44. ^ "Alice Munro". 10 July 2015. Retrieved 27 July 2015. 

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