Act Without Words

References

  1. ^ a b c Beckett, S., Collected Shorter Plays of Samuel Beckett, London: Faber and Faber, 1984, p 43
  2. ^ Beckett, S., Collected Shorter Plays of Samuel Beckett, London: Faber and Faber, 1984, p 43
  3. ^ a b c d Lamont, R. C., ‘To Speak the Words of “The Tribe”: The Wordlessness of Samuel Beckett’s Metaphysical Clowns’ in Burkman, K. H., (Ed.) Myth and Ritual in the Plays of Samuel Beckett (London and Toronto: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1987), p 60
  4. ^ Beckett, S., Collected Shorter Plays of Samuel Beckett, London: Faber and Faber, 1984, p 44
  5. ^ a b c Gontarski, S. E., ‘Birth Astride a Grave: Samuel Beckett’s Act Without Words I’ in The Beckett Studies Reader (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1993), pp 29-34
  6. ^ Ackerley, C. J. and Gontarski, S. E., (Eds.) The Faber Companion to Samuel Beckett, London: Faber and Faber, 2006, p 3
  7. ^ Knowlson, J., Damned to Fame: The Life of Samuel Beckett (London: Bloomsbury, 1996), p 419
  8. ^ Beckett, S., The Expelled and Other Novellas (London:Penguin Books, 1980), p 34
  9. ^ Ackerley, C. J. and Gontarski, S. E., (Eds.) The Faber Companion to Samuel Beckett, London: Faber and Faber, 2006, pp 3,4
  10. ^ The German word geworfenheit means 'thrown down' and was used by Heidegger to describe the accidental nature of human existence in a world that has not yet been made our own by conscious choice. We have no control of much of our existence. Some of the obvious but ignored facticities include the era in which we are born, our gender and sex, our mother tongue, and our body type. [1]
  11. ^ Oppenheim, L., ‘Anonymity and Individuation: The Interrelation of Two Linguistic Functions in Not I and Rockaby’ in Davis, R. J. and Butler, L. St J., (Eds.) ‘Make Sense Who May’: Essays on Samuel Beckett’s Later Works (Gerrards Cross: Colin Smythe, 1988)', p 42
  12. ^ Beckett, S., Waiting for Godot, London: Faber and Faber, [1956] 1988, p 89
  13. ^ Ackerley, C. J. and Gontarski, S. E., (Eds.) The Faber Companion to Samuel Beckett, London: Faber and Faber, 2006, p 4
  14. ^ Lamont, R. C., ‘To Speak the Words of “The Tribe”: The Wordlessness of Samuel Beckett’s Metaphysical Clowns’ in Burkman, K. H., (Ed.) Myth and Ritual in the Plays of Samuel Beckett (London and Toronto: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1987)', p 60
  15. ^ Barnard, G. C., Samuel Beckett: A New Approach, (New York: Dodd, Mead & Company, 1970), p 109
  16. ^ ”Birth was the death of him.” – A Piece of Monologue in Beckett, S., Collected Shorter Plays of Samuel Beckett, London: Faber and Faber, 1984, p 265

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